Interested in how a divorce court will value your home? Read this blog post to find out how

Interested in how a divorce court will value your home? Read this blog post to find out how

Originally published by The Law Office of Bryan Fagan, PLLC Blog.

Once you have hired a licensed real estate appraiser, real estate agent or done a comparable home search on the county appraisal website to determine a likely value for your home, you have done most of the work that is related to value your house for the purpose of selling it. The next thing you to do is consider whether or not you need to remove “incidental” costs associated with the sale of the home from that appraised value.

Incidental costs are things like closing costs and realtor fees. From my experience, these costs are way too speculative to include in the value of the house. Closing costs vary across properties and title companies. There are no specific cases that I am aware of in Texas that say one way or the other how this subject is to be treated. However, I would be willing to argue based on the previous couple points I made that they should not be deducted from the appraised value of the home.

Fair market value is what you are going after when looking for the value of your family home

Anyone of us who took high school economics is likely familiar with the term “fair market value.” This term can be defined as the amount that would be paid in cash by a willing buyer who desires to buy but is not required to buy, to a willing seller who desires to sell but is no under no necessity of selling. That definition is one that is pulled from something called the Texas Pattern Jury Charge. There is no mention of realtor charges or closing costs in that definition. Closing costs vary from transaction to transaction. Realtor costs may not even come into being if a realtor is not used or if the house is never actually sold.

Reimbursement claims and the family home

This is a subject that is near and dear to the heart of almost every person who goes through a divorce. Reimbursement claims can be a difficult subject to explain to clients because it is a concept that tugs at concepts of “fairness” and “equity.” If you contributed income to the separate property of your spouse, in a divorce you have a right to be reimbursed for those monies. However, it can be very difficult to calculate those kinds of claims.

There is nothing in the Texas Family Code that instructs a family court judge on how to calculate to proceed on a reimbursement claim made in conjunction with a divorce case. The judge has full discretion on determining how much reimbursement to award to a petitioning spouse or even whether or not to acknowledge the claim.

For instance, if your spouse has a separate property home with a mortgage on it that has been paid during the course of your marriage then you are in a position where you will need to prove how much of the principal of that mortgage has been reduced during the course of your marriage in order to proceed with a reimbursement claim. Mortgage statements pulled from the internet or requested directly from your lender are a means to do so. Many websites have amortization schedules that show how much of each mortgage payment goes towards principal, interest and escrow funds. Tax returns that show mortgage payments as well.

Finally, another relatively common reimbursement claim that we see in divorce cases is when community money is used to make improvements on a separate property home. An example could be if your spouse and you used your combined incomes to make an improvement on a home that you owned before you two got married. The value of your reimbursement claim would be how much the value of the home increased due to the improvements that were made.

As you could probably guess based on the time we devoted in yesterday and today’s blog posts to determining how to value your family home, this can be quite a difficult job. It is not readily apparent how much a new kitchen, pool, updated bathroom or solar panels on the roof actually added value to the home. A real estate agent can serve as an expert witness in this capacity if it were an issue brought up at trial.

How can your family home be divided in your divorce?

There are many options available to a judge when it comes to dividing up your family home in a divorce. Keep in mind that these options are only available to a judge if you and your spouse cannot come to an agreement on your own when it comes to valuing the home and then either dividing it in a sale or allowing one of you to remain in the home while the other has their community property interest bought out.

Option number one is the clearest cut and simple for a judge: he or she would simply determine that the home is the separate property of either you or your spouse. No muss, no fuss. Next, the house could be awarded to either you or your spouse. Along with this option, the judge could award you the house but allow your spouse to reside in the home for a specific period of time after the divorce. This option could be chosen in the event that your spouse showed that it would be difficult to locate suitable housing quickly after the divorce.

For those of you who reside in rural areas, your real estate could be partitioned by the judge. For instance, consider that if you were awarded the home, your spouse could be awarded the majority of the land surrounding the home to compensate him for the loss he would take in his community property interest in that residence.

Finally, your house could be ordered to be sold and the equity (after closing costs and realtor fees) would be split between you and your spouse based on a percentage.

What happens with the mortgage on your home after a divorce?

This is a very relevant subject to discuss in conjunction with a divorce case. Most of us reading this blog post live in a suburban/urban environment in a single family home. Whether or not you would consider your immediate surroundings to be a neighborhood or not, it is likely that you and your spouse own a home in a neighborhood-type environment where the mortgage on that home bears both your name and that of your spouse. What many attorneys fail to do in connection with a divorce is properly explain what can happen with the mortgage once your divorce is over with. I will seek to provide you with some clarification on this subject so you enter your own divorce with a bit more knowledge.

Let’s say, for example, that your spouse is awarded the family home in your divorce case. He is also ordered to pay the mortgage going forward- a mortgage that has both of your names on it. Here is what I would tell you if you were represented by our office. First, the divorce decree is a legal document that is binding upon you and your spouse but it does not affect your personal obligation under the mortgage contract. If you’re soon to be ex-spouse fails to make payments on time for the mortgage then your credit score gets dinged.

Next, if you do well in the financial portions of your divorce and have a down payment ready to go for your next house you may have trouble qualifying for a mortgage. The reason for this is that your name is already on a mortgage to your former home. Your debt to income ratio will be skewed as a result of your technically owing money on another home. It is theoretically possible to not be able to qualify for a mortgage on your new house if your spouse is not current on payments on the “old” mortgage.

How can you get your name off the joint mortgage to your old house?

That discussion should lead you to ask the question of how, then, can you go about removing your name from the old mortgage to your former home?

One option that I have seen implemented in a final decree of divorce (the final orders for a divorce case in Texas) would be to order your spouse to refinance the home within X number of days from the date the divorce becomes final. No refinance is possible until the divorce is finalized since ownership of the home before that time is still in both your name and his. It is possible that your spouse, while able to be awarded the home in your divorce, does not qualify financially to be able to refinance the mortgage into their own name. A low income, low credit score, bad debt to income ratio or a combination of all of those factors could play into the reason why this is the case.

Another option to pursue could be that your spouse can sign documents that cause him to assume complete responsibility for the mortgage moving forward. The availability of this option depends on your lender. Your spouse should contact the mortgage lender as soon as he becomes aware that he is going to get the house in your divorce to see if this is an option that he can pursue. Again, however, your spouse needs to show that he can qualify for the process of assuming sole responsibility on the mortgage.

If neither of these two options is available then the home will likely be ordered to be sold by the judge. Most judges will not put you or your spouse in a position to fall behind in the mortgage payment and put both of you in a bad financial position. As a result, if no suitable arrangement can be made it is very likely that a sale of your home will commence.

Pulling equity out of your family home in a Texas divorce

Selling the home is by far the easiest method of pulling equity out of your home during a divorce. The equity can then be split between you and your spouse without much fuss, according to the terms of the judge’s orders or your mediated settlement agreement. Usually, if your spouse is awarded the home in your divorce then the equity can be pulled out in the following manners.

If your spouse gets the house, then you will be awarded a community property asset that equals the share of equity that would ordinarily be yours had the house been sold. Or, if there is insufficient community property to divide you may be able to get some portion of your spouse’s community property share as well as a separate property bank account of your spouse’s.

We will discuss the additional ways to cash out the equity stake in a family home in tomorrow’s blog post. We hope that you have enjoyed today’s blog and we will return tomorrow to finish up where we left off by talking more about cashing out equity in the family home.

Questions about divorce and dividing up the family home? Contact the Law Office of Bryan Fagan 

The attorneys with the Law Office of Bryan Fagan stand ready to assist you with any questions or concerns you have regarding your Texas family law case. Our attorneys have represented clients in every family court in southeast Texas and we do so with a great deal of pride.

To learn more about your case, our office or family law, in general, please do not hesitate to contact us today. We offer free of charge consultations six days a week. These consultations are a great opportunity for you to ask questions and receive feedback about your specific circumstances. Thank you for spending time with us today in reading our blog post.

And remember- the Law Office of Bryan Fagan is On Your Side!

Curated by Texas Bar Today. Follow us on Twitter @texasbartoday.



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The Castle Doctrine as a Defense in Texas

Originally published by Family and Criminal Law Blog.

What is the Castle Doctrine and when might it apply in a Texas criminal case?

Texas’ so-called Castle Doctrine has become a topic of interest for people across the country due to the widely followed criminal case against Amber Guyger. Former Dallas police officer Amber Guyger was charged with murder after shooting unarmed Botham Jean in his apartment in 2018. At trial, off-duty police officer Guyger claimed that at the time of the shooting, she believed she was in her own apartment. Guyger lived exactly one floor down from Jean and was coming off a long shift. She claims she accidentally entered the wrong apartment, saw Jean’s silhouette and believed he was an intruder. She fatally shot her neighbor.

Guyger’s defense was multi-faceted, first requiring that the jury accept her assertion that she was operating under a mistake of fact. The jury had to believe that she indeed thought she was in her own apartment. Next, Guyger’s defense rests on the Castle Doctrine, which authorizes deadly force in the defense of yourself while on your property. Evidently, the jury did not accept Guyger’s defense, as she was convicted and recently sentenced to ten years. The case, however, raised interesting issues regarding the Castle Doctrine and when exactly it may prove successful.

What is the Castle Doctrine?

The Castle Doctrine is a term that describes the 2007 Senate Bill, which was passed to authorize the use of deadly forces under limited circumstances. The law states that if you are within your castle, which is defined as your home, business, or car, then deadly force used is presumed to be reasonable. The state bears the burden of proving beyond a reasonable doubt that the force used should not be deemed reasonable.

In the state of Texas, a defendant charged with murder or another crime of violence may be able to raise the claim of self-defense if they believed someone was illegally on their property; they reasonably believed deadly force was necessary; they did not provoke the person; and they were not engaged in criminal activity at the time the force was used.

In Guyger’s case, it is unclear whether the jury rejected the Castle Doctrine or the essential mistake of fact. Texas criminal defendants who acted in self-defense will want to ask their attorney about the castle doctrine to find out whether they may wish to raise this defense at trial.

Curated by Texas Bar Today. Follow us on Twitter @texasbartoday.



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Child Custody Attorney

Child Custody in Texas: Who Can Claim a Child on Their Taxes?

Originally published by stark.

Child Custody AttorneyFollowing a divorce or separation, parents need to determine who will claim their children on their taxes. As the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) explains, only one parent can claim a child on their taxes. If both parents try to claim a child, it will cause problems. In this article, our Texas child custody lawyers explain the most important things separated parents need to know about the rules for who can claim a child.

The Parent Who Has Primary Physical Custody Has the Right to Claim the Child

Under IRS rules, the parent who has primary custody of a child has the first right to claim that child on their tax return. For example, if your child spends 75 percent of their time with you and 25 percent of their time with the other parent, then you have the right to claim your child on your taxes. When primary custody is clear, there is little dispute over who has the right to claim the child.

Tiebreaker: Parent with Higher Income Should Claim the Child

In some cases, parents have a genuine 50-50 custody arrangement in place. The IRS has developed a basic tiebreaker rule to deal with this: The parent who has a higher income for the tax year in question should claim the child. Often, the parent with the higher income will gain a larger tax benefit from claiming a child. This can free up some extra money in tax savings, which can be used to support the family as a whole.                                                                

It May Be Financially Advantageous to Allow the Non-Custodial Parent to Claim a Child

To be clear, a parent with primary custody does not necessarily have to claim their child on their taxes. In some cases, it will be advantageous for both parties to have the non-custodial parent claim the kids. For example, if the custodial parent has relatively little taxable income — at least in comparison to the non-custodial parent — they may not be able to fully utilize the benefits of child tax deduction and child tax credits.

In this situation, both parents can attach Form 8332 to their tax return. By doing so, they will be able to seamlessly allow the non-custodial parent to claim the child. Transferring the right to claim a child will sometimes free up some additional tax savings — which can be split between the parties or used to directly support the child. You do not want to leave money on the table: Make sure you and your former spouse/partner are using tax child deductions/credits in the most effective manner.

Get Help from Our Texas Family Lawyers Today

At Orsinger, Nelson, Downing and Anderson, LLP, our Texas family law attorneys are committed to protecting the financial interests of our clients. Our lawyers are consistently ranked among the best divorce and custody attorneys in the state. To arrange a strictly confidential initial consultation, please contact our legal team at (214) 273-2400. With offices in Dallas, Frisco, Fort Worth, and San Antonio, our family law practice serves clients throughout Texas.

The post Child Custody in Texas: Who Can Claim a Child on Their Taxes? appeared first on ONDA Family Law.

Curated by Texas Bar Today. Follow us on Twitter @texasbartoday.



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Texas Court Grants Grandparents Visitation and Access to Grandchildren

Texas Court Grants Grandparents Visitation and Access to Grandchildren

Originally published by Francesca Blackard.

By

Under Texas family law, a court may grant grandparents reasonable possession and access to a grandchild if three conditions are met.  First, at least one of the child’s parents, whether adoptive or biological, must have parental rights to the child.  Second, the grandparent must overcome the presumption the child’s parent is acting in the child’s best interest by showing that denying the grandparent possession or access would result in significant impairment to the child’s health or well-being.  Finally, the grandparent must be the parent of the child’s parent, and that parent must have been incarcerated during the past three months, have been found incompetent, be deceased, or not have possession or access to the child.  TEX. FAM. CODE ANN. § 153.433.

In a recent case, a father challenged an order allowing the maternal grandparents possession and access to his children.  The parents and children stayed with the grandparents while they looked for a house when they moved to Texas from California.  The grandparents supported the family so the parents could save up to buy the home.  After the parents bought a home nearby, the children regularly visited their grandparents, sometimes overnight.  The grandparents would take the children to school and attend school functions.  The grandmother testified she felt she had assumed the role of parent.

The grandmother testified both parents were alcoholics.  The mother’s friend testified the parents had a tense and unhealthy relationship.  There was testimony that the mother sent the children to stay with the grandparents when the situation at home grew tense.  The father’s friend testified the father left the children with the grandparents when he went to bars and nudist colonies.  He also testified the father told him he often argued with the mother, but did not state the arguments ever turned physical.

 

The mother sadly died in 2018.  The children stayed with their grandmother for several days and the oldest child told the grandmother they were going to live with their other grandparents in California.

The grandparents promptly filed suit seeking sole managing conservatorship.  Although they obtained a temporary restraining order to keep the father from moving the children from the county/ the children went to live with their paternal grandparents in California when it expired.

The grandparents amended their petition to seek possession and access to the children under the grandparent access statute.  Following a trial, the court found the grandparents had proved by a preponderance of the evidence that denying them possession or access would significantly impair the health or well-being of the children.  The court granted the grandparents possession for one weekend during the fall and spring semester and seven days during the summer.  The grandparents were also allowed phone, Skype, or FaceTime access.  They were also allowed to send cards, letters, and gifts.

The father appealed.  In this case, the only element at issue was whether the grandparents had overcome the presumption the father was acting in the children’s best interest.  The father argued the grandparents had not submitted evidence of any impairment to the children from denial of access.  He testified the children were doing very well and had not shown any need for psychological treatment or counseling.  They lived with his parents, where the oldest had her own room and the boys shared a room.  They were physically safe and doing well psychologically.

The grandparents argued the father had not provided counseling for the children and planned to deny all access to the grandparents.  The appeals court noted that the leading cases overturning orders granting grandparent access involved evidence that the parent would not deny the grandparent all access to the child.  The father testified he would not allow any access or possession of the children unless ordered to do so by the court.

The appeals court found no evidence denying the grandparents access would significantly impair the physical health of the children, but there was sufficient evidence it would significantly impair their emotional well-being.  The grandmother testified denying them access would not be in the children’s best interest.  The mother’s friend and the father’s friend each testified they did not think the father was acting in the children’s best interest.  The grandmother testified the children had lost their mother, grandmother, and home, and had moved to live with grandparents they had rarely seen.  There was evidence regarding the father’s heavy drinking and potential alcoholism.

The father testified that the children did not exhibit any emotional turmoil.  He said they did not ask about their grandparents.  He testified they were healthy and doing well.

The appeals court found the trial court could have reasonably disbelieved the father’s evidence and found the grandparents overcame the parental presumption by a preponderance of the evidence.  The appeals court affirmed the order.

Although it can be difficult for grandparents to get access and possession of their grandchildren, it is possible under certain circumstances.  This case may have turned on the father’s intent to deny all access to the grandparents.  If you are seeking or fighting grandparents’ rights, a knowledgeable Texas custody attorney can advise you and fight for your rights.  Call McClure Law Group at 214.692.8200 to set up a meeting to talk about your case.

Curated by Texas Bar Today. Follow us on Twitter @texasbartoday.



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Texas Court Orders Child’s Name Change to Include His Father’s Surname

Texas Court Orders Child’s Name Change to Include His Father’s Surname

Originally published by Robert Epstein.

By

Under Texas family law, a court may order a child’s name be changed if doing so is in the child’s best interest.  Neither parent is specifically granted the right to name the child under Texas law, but generally a child’s name will not be changed unless the party seeking the change shows a good reason for it.  In a recent case, a mother challenged a court’s order to change the child’s name to include the father’s last name.

The parties appeared to have a good co-parenting relationship.  According to the appeals court’s opinion, the child lived with the mother, but the father had always been a part of his life and assisted financially with his living expenses.  The father’s family was also significantly involved in the child’s life, helping the mother financially and with child care.

The mother had been adopted as a young child.  She grew up in Virginia and moved to Texas when she was 18.  She did not have any family other than her son in Texas.  Due to the distance, the child did not have the same amount of interaction with his mother’s family that he had with his father’s family.

 

The mother testified her surname was her adoptive family’s name.  She also testified it was important for her son to have her surname because he was the only biological relative she knew.  She also said it could help him be connected to “different pieces of himself and his history.” She did not believe having her surname instead of his father’s would have a negative effect on the child.

The father testified he thought a name change would help avoid confusion at places like doctor’s offices.  He also hoped the child would play sports and wanted the child to use the father’s name.

Both parents agreed the child was too young to know his name.  Each also said they would not change their surnames.

The father testified the mother did not give him a choice regarding the child’s name.  He also indicated he believed he did not have a choice with regard to signing the acknowledgement of paternity.  He testified he thought the child would have trouble when he got older if he did not have his father’s last name.  He said he did not know any children who did not use their father’s last name, though the children he knew had parents who were married to each other.

The father’s father testified to what he and his wife had done for the child and his mother.  He also testified that he was very close to the child.  He testified that they did things for the child and his mother because they loved them both.

The trial court found it was in the child’s best interest to change his name to include his father’s last name.  The mother appealed, arguing the evidence was legally and factually insufficient to support the finding.

In considering whether a name change would be in a child’s best interest, the court considers various nonexclusive factors, including whether it would avoid embarrassment, inconvenience, or confusion for the custodial parent or child, whether the present or potential changed name would be more convenient, how long the current name has been used, how the change affects the child’s bond with the parent or other family members, and whether the parent is trying to alienate the other parent by seeking the change.  Courts do not have to weight each factor equally.

The appeals court found there was little or no evidence that changing the child’s name would have a negative effect on the mother or child.  The appeals court found there was legally and factually sufficient evidence to support a finding the change would be in the child’s best interest.  The child was only 14 months old and therefore did not have meaningful attachment to his mother’s name.  He had not started school or been involved in extracurricular activities under his mother’s name.  The child was on the father’s health insurance, so the court found it could be beneficial for medical appointments and billing for the child to have his father’s name.

The appeals court acknowledged the mother was the primary caretaker, but also noted the father and his family were an important part of the child’s life.  The mother’s family was less involved in the child’s daily life due to distance. The appeals court found the father’s last name would better help identify the child with a family unit.  The mother and her family were not from the area and did not have the type of ties to the local community that the father’s family had.  The appeals court found having the father’s name would strengthen the child’s relationship with the community.

Finally, the appeals court found the father was not seeking the change to alienate the mother from the child. There was evidence that the father and his family cared for the mother and expected to continue doing so.

The appeals court found no abuse of discretion in the trial court’s finding that changing the child’s name to include his father’s surname was in the child’s best interest.  The appeals court affirmed the trial court’s judgment.

Sometimes unusual disputes arise in matters relating to children, even if both parents care for each other and want to work together.  If you are facing a dispute involving child custody or other matters relating to your children, an experienced Texas family law attorney can help.  Call McClure Law Group at 214.692.8200.

Curated by Texas Bar Today. Follow us on Twitter @texasbartoday.



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What a Tangled Web We Weave By Signing Documents We Don’t Read

What a Tangled Web We Weave By Signing Documents We Don’t Read

Originally published by Kim Hegwood.

One of the questions we ask our estate planning clients is what documents they have already signed that might dictate …

The post What a Tangled Web We Weave By Signing Documents We Don’t Read appeared first on Hegwood Law Group.

Curated by Texas Bar Today. Follow us on Twitter @texasbartoday.



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Court Lifts Texas OAG Suspension of Driver’s License for Failure to Pay Child Support

Court Lifts Texas OAG Suspension of Driver’s License for Failure to Pay Child Support

Originally published by Kelly McClure.

By

The Texas Office of the Attorney General (OAG) is responsible for certain child support services, including collecting and enforcing Texas child support orders.  Recipients of certain public assistance programs may automatically qualify for the OAG’s child support services, but others have to apply for the services.  The OAG has a variety of ways to enforce child support, including filing liens, issuing writs of withholdings to the parent’s employer, suspending driver’s licenses, and intercepting tax refunds or other money from state or federal sources.

In a recent case, a father challenged the OAG’s enforcement actions against him.  The father was ordered to pay child support beginning in December 1996.  The court also issued an Order Enforcing Child Support Obligation in October 1999, including a cumulative money judgment for $15,000 plus interest against the father in favor of the Attorney General.

In 2015, the OAG sent a notice of child support lien to the father’s bank and issued administrative writs of withholding to his employers.  The OAG also filed a petition with the State Office of Administrative Hearings for the father’s driver’s license suspension.

 

The father filed a motion alleging the OAG violated provisions of the Texas Family Code because it failed to obtain a cumulative money judgment within 10 years of the child becoming an adult.  The OAG did not appear at the hearing.  The trial court lifted the driver’s license suspension, rescinded the writs of withholding, declared the child support liens void, and ordered no further wage withholding.

The OAG filed a restricted appeal.  The OAG argued the trial court did not have subject matter jurisdiction over the driver’s license suspension because the relevant statute required the father to file his petition for review in Travis County district court.  A proceeding regarding the suspension of a parent’s driver’s license for failure to pay child support is governed by the Administrative Procedure Act.  The Administrative Procedure Act requires a person seeking judicial review of a contested case to file the petition in a Travis County district court unless another statute provides otherwise.  TEX. GOV’T CODE ANN. § 2001.176.

The father did not file his petition in a Travis County district court.  The OAG argued that the trial court did not have subject matter jurisdiction over the issue.  The appeals court, however, found that that the statute did not grant Travis County district court with exclusive jurisdiction, but instead provided a mandatory venue.  Mandatory venue, the court noted, may be waived if a party fails to make a timely objection.  The OAG had not made a timely objection.

The OAG also argued the trial court had exceeded its subject matter jurisdiction in enjoining additional administrative writs of withholding.  Under TEX. GOV’T CODE ANN. § 22.002(c), only the Texas supreme court has the authority to issue a writ of mandamus or injunction against an officer of Texas’s executive departments to order or compel performance of a duty state law authorizes the officer to perform.  The appeals court noted  the OAG is an officer of the executive department and is authorized to enforce and collect child support through administrative writs of withholding.  Thus, only the supreme court could enjoin the OAG from issuing such writs in this case.  The appeals court found that the portion of the order stating that “no further wages be withheld in this cause…” constituted an injunction.

The appeals court vacated the part of the trial court’s order that enjoined the OAG from issuing additional administrative writs of withholding and affirmed the rest of the order.

The OAG will become involved in certain cases involving public assistance.  Although parents in other cases may seek the OAG’s assistance, parents should be aware of what OAG enforcement entails.  Once the OAG is involved, the parents are not able to choose which enforcement actions will be taken.  If you are facing a child support issue, an experienced Texas child support attorney can help you consider your options and protect your rights.  Call McClure Law Group at 214.692.8200 to set up an appointment.

Curated by Texas Bar Today. Follow us on Twitter @texasbartoday.



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3 Things Family Law Attorneys Should Offer You

3 Things Family Law Attorneys Should Offer You

Solutions, referrals, and realistic goals. All family law attorneys should be offering these three things to clients.

The post 3 Things Family Law Attorneys Should Offer You appeared first on Divorce Magazine.

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Do Stepparents Have Child Custody Rights or Child Visitation Rights After a Texas Divorce?

Do Stepparents Have Child Custody Rights or Child Visitation Rights After a Texas Divorce?

Originally published by stark.

Do Stepparents Have Child Custody Rights or Child Visitation Rights After a Texas Divorce? 1Stepparents play a very important role in a child’s life. According to the most recent report from The Step Family Foundation, over 50 percent of U.S. families are recoupled. As blended families are becoming more and more common, this raises an important question: Do stepparents have any custody or visitation rights to their stepchildren after a divorce? The answer: “sometimes”—but those rights are limited and they are not automatic. Here, our Dallas child custody attorneys provide an overview of the key things that you need to know about step-parent rights after a divorce.

Texas Law: Step-Parents are ‘Interested Third Parties’

 Stepparents are not granted any automatic child custody or child visitation rights. Unlike a child’s biological parents, there is no assumption of parental rights. Instead, state law views stepparents as being “interested third parties.” Practically speaking, this means that a stepparent’s custody or visitation rights are similar to a child’s aunt, uncle, or another semi-close relative.

To be clear, stepparents have the right to petition for visitation with their stepchildren after a divorce. While it is often difficult to get court-ordered visitation rights over the objections of the child’s parent(s), it is legally possible. Should a dispute arise over step-parent visitation/custody, Texas courts will resolve issues under the state’s ‘best interests of the child’ standard (Texas Family Code § 153.002).

 How Our Child Custody Attorneys Can Help

 Stepparent custody and visitation cases are especially complicated. At Orsinger, Nelson, Downing and Anderson, LLP, we have the unique skills, experience, and training needed to help guide parents and stepparents through the legal process. With more than 100,000 attorneys practicing in Texas, there is no other law firm that has as many Top 100 Super Lawyers as we do. When you reach out to our firm, you will get a top-rated Texas child custody lawyer who will:

  • Conduct a confidential, in-depth review of your stepparent custody/visitation case;
  • Listen to your story, answer your questions, and devise a sensible strategy;
  • Look for mutually agreeable solutions that resolve conflict at the lowest possible level; and
  • Take whatever legal action is necessary to protect your rights and your family.

We know that there are no one-size-fits-all solutions in family law—especially when children are involved. Our custody & visitation lawyers provide each and every parent with the fully personalized legal assistance that they deserve. Our goal is to help you find an effective and low conflict resolution that works for you and your family. At the same time, we are trial-tested family law litigators. Our lawyers are always prepared to take aggressive action to protect your parental rights.

 Discuss Your Case with Our Texas Child Custody Lawyers Today

At Orsinger, Nelson, Downing and Anderson, LLP, our compassionate Texas child custody lawyers are experienced, effective advocates for parents. If you have any questions about stepparent rights, we can help. To schedule a strictly confidential initial consultation, please call us at (214) 273-2400 or contact us directly online. From our offices in Dallas, Fort Worth, and Frisco, we represent parents throughout North Texas.

The post Do Stepparents Have Child Custody Rights or Child Visitation Rights After a Texas Divorce? appeared first on ONDA Family Law.

Curated by Texas Bar Today. Follow us on Twitter @texasbartoday.



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What court will hear issues about your child in relation to an international divorce?

What court will hear issues about your child in relation to an international divorce?

Originally published by The Law Office of Bryan Fagan, PLLC Blog.

What court will hear issues about your child in relation to an international divorce?

There is a great deal of uncertainty associated with divorce. For starters, you have no idea how long your case could last. You’ve probably heard horror stories about divorces that have taken years to complete and are worried about yours ending up the same way. Tied to that concern you may be wondering how you are going to afford to pay for the divorce. Attorney’s fees, court costs are just the tip of the iceberg from what you can tell.

What if you were also in a position where you didn’t even know where you would need to ask for a divorce? Many Texas residents know that all we would need to do in order to file for divorce was to submit some paperwork at the local county courthouse in order to start the process. You may not be in that same position, however. If you have resided outside of the State of Texas- or outside of the United States altogether- you may have questions about what court will be able to hear your case in the first place.

Beyond any immediate concerns about yourself, you are likely concerned with what outcome your children will encounter because of your divorce. Kids are the innocent by-standards in any divorce. Because you and your spouse are ending your marriage your children are now facing up to the effects of that choice. You want to do every possible to shield them from the brunt of the divorce but are unclear on some issues associated with your potential case. For starters, what will happen if your child has ties to more than one state- or more than one country?

Custody options that are available when a child has lived in multiple countries

Knowing what options are available to you as well as what courts are available to issue rulings regarding child custody matters ought to be one of the first issues that you explore as you prepare to file for a divorce.

The Uniform Child Custody Jurisdiction Enforcement Act (UCCJEA) has been adopted by all fifty states and seeks to address jurisdictional problems that are relevant in our country and across the globe. Asking and answering a few questions within the framework of the UCCJEA can tell you a great deal of information about what court is the appropriate venue to file your divorce or child custody case within.

For starters, you will need to determine where your child has been a resident for the past six months. Next, consider whether or not your child has a true home country. If you and your spouse have moved so frequently that it would not be fair to call one country or another their “home” for the purposes of a divorce then you would be going off of where your child has lived during the past six months.

If your child does have a home country where he or she has been raised and is attending school, the next question you need to ask yourself is whether or not a court in that country has already stated that jurisdiction is proper there. However, consider that if you now reside in the United States and have done so for at least six months it may be better suited for your family to file your divorce in the U.S. All of these considerations go out the window if an emergency arises that requires intervention by a court at a moment’s notice, such as when an abduction of your child occurs.

Jurisdiction in international child custody cases is far from simple

As we have seen in the past few blog posts on our website, determining child custody jurisdiction in international cases is not simple at all, unfortunately. You need to be able to balance complex issues with one another while balancing what is in the best interests of your child throughout the evaluation.

Under the UCCJEA a court in the United States may be required to apply the custody laws or another nation in enforcing a foreign court order or even creating a brand-new order for you and your child. As with anything associated with family law, it is strongly recommended that your attorney not only have experience handling child custody cases but also have experience in handling cases that involve the UCCJEA.

Be aware of child abduction issues in connection with international child abduction cases

It is not uncommon to encounter child custody cases wherein one parent attempts to ignore, brazenly, the child custody laws of one country in order to gain entry to a nation whose circumstances are more advantageous. If your child’s other parent believes the laws in their country of origin are “better suited” for him or her then it is not out of the question for him or her to attempt to remove your child without your permission from the United States or whatever country, you currently reside in.

I do not tell you all this in order to frighten or intimidate you. I mention it because it is a relevant consideration in an age where mobility has never been easier. Courts in the United States hear issues all the time of international child abduction cases. The goals of these courts are to quickly and correctly address the issues in that specific case with the goal of returning the children to their home country.

When courts are effective in addressing issues and returning children back to their parents, they not only help the family who is involved in the case but also discourage parents from taking matters into their own hands by attempting to create jurisdiction over a child by means of abduction. What these parents do not consider is that almost every country in the world has signed on to the UCCJEA and would apply the laws of the nation where the child just left in any custody case.

How you can present a case to have your child returned to you 

In the event that you are left behind by your child’s other parent, there are concrete steps that you can legally take in order to have your child returned to you. First, you must be able to establish that he or she was consistently a resident of that country. As a parent, you must next show that based on the laws of your home country you had parental rights. Keep in mind that if you are an absentee parent this could cause problems for you, given that those parental rights must be acted upon. If you do not have a minimal amount of contact with your child it will be difficult to convince a court to have your child returned home.

What can the “other” parent argue in a contested child custody hearing regarding abduction?

If you are in a position where your child has been removed from the United States and taken to another country, you may have some concerns about what your spouse or child’s other parent may be able to argue as far as why the abduction was justified under the law. As I just mentioned, one of the most effective means of legitimizing the actions of the abducting parent would be to argue that you as the non-abducting parent has not attempted to exercise your parental rights. Your not taking an active role in the life of your child could come back to haunt you if this is the case.

Next, if you agreed to the removal of your child from the United States at any point this could also hamper your argument that your child needs to be returned. An email from a few weeks ago where you and your child’s other parent outlined an agreement between the two of you to allow him to take your daughter to Saudi Arabia can diminish the strength of any arguments you have as to why your child needs to be returned to you.

At the very least, if the abducting parent can show a court that while you did not exactly endorse the move if you were not vociferous or took no action to prevent the abduction then it probably cannot properly be called an abduction at all.

Finally, your child’s other parent may attempt to present an argument that your child was facing a serious risk of harm by remaining with you in their “home” country. If there is an issue related to your family, or to the political climate of your home country this can be an effective argument to make. The best interests of your child are going to bee at the forefront of the decision making any court utilizes and showing that child abuse had been ongoing can be an effective tool to utilize.

The age of your child may be a relevant consideration, as well

Even if your spouse or child’s other parent cannot effectively present an argument such as the ones, we have just been discussing it is possible that if your child is old enough, his or her preference to remain in the new country could bolster the case of the abducting parent. The opinion and/or wishes of your sixteen-year-old are likely to be taken a lot more seriously than those of your six-year-old child, mind you.

Do not delay if you seek to challenge the abduction of your child to another country

Act quickly if your child has been abducted from the United States. Under the relevant international treaty, a case requesting the return of your child to this country must be filed within a year of the removal. Once you get beyond this one-year time-frame it is simpler for the abducting parent to make an argument that your child has become more familiar and comfortable in their surroundings. Finding a home, a place to go to school and friends will create a home-like atmosphere that will be tougher for you to counter with arguments of your own. Keep in mind that if you file your lawsuit to have your child returned to the United States within a year of their removal then the opposing party cannot present this argument.

The bottom line is that you need to have a sense of urgency when it comes to your actions that are taken in the time period immediately following the abduction of your child. I’m sure that this will not be difficult, as I can only imagine the fear and anger that would arise in me if this happened to one of my children. Do not let fear or the unknown or concerns about external issues weigh you down and prevent you from making a decision that could save your family from a great deal of hardship,

If you find yourself in a position where you need to hire an attorney to help you fight for you, make sure that you verify that the attorney has experience in international child custody matters. Family law experience is not good enough for one of these cases. When your relationship with your child is concerned you cannot afford to take any chances. Seek out representation that has had proven results in order to give yourself the best chance at a successful outcome.

Questions about international divorce or child custody cases? Contact the Law Office of Bryan Fagan

Thank you for your interest in this topic. If you have any questions about the material that we presented today or seek clarification on anything please do not hesitate to contact the Law Office of Bryan Fagan. Our licensed family law attorneys offer free of charge consultations six days a week where we can answer your questions and address your concerns in a comfortable and pressure-free environment. Our attorneys and staff take a great deal of pride in providing comprehensive, family law services to our clients.

No matter where you live in southeast Texas, we are here to serve you. From Baytown to Waller and up to Conroe, our attorneys will put your interests first and advise you to take steps that will seek to improve your family’s well-being.

Curated by Texas Bar Today. Follow us on Twitter @texasbartoday.



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