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Dublin 2020: Dr. Childress and the Gardnerian Debate

There’s going to be a Gardnerian Conference in Dublin in April.

I think I’ll go over and do a seminar on the Saturday before their conference thing, that way interested people can hear Dr. Childress and then hear the Gardnerian PAS “experts” and do a direct side-by-side comparison of us both, and what we are saying.

I figured I’d start now on this examination of differences, compare and contrast, by taking a look at the roster for their conference.  Looks impressive, doesn’t it.

I’m not impressed with the psychology side, seems pretty non-existent.  A couple people there, we’ll see who they are.  Medicine is heavily represented by Bill Bernet, M.D. and Steve Miller, M.D.  There’s multiple legal representation, but not much psychology.

But I’ll cover all of that, running down each of the presenters.  I’ll provide my comments over a series of blogs, going down that list.  Taking a look at the pathogen’s “loyal opposition.”

Gardnerian PAS Dublin Conference

Top Tier

Across the top row of their poster are three apparent heavyweights, William Beret, M.D.  A psychiatrist.  Judge Phillip Marcus (Israel, retired).  A legal professional.  Steve Miller, M.D. A physician.

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Of intriguing note is that Bill Bernet, an M.D. psychiatrist (medical doctor) is being presented as a “Professor” rather than a psychiatrist, and Steve Miller, and M.D. internal medicine physican is being preseted as an expert in “Psychology” – the first word under his name, “Psychology” – he’s not a psychologist.

I have tremendous respect for the court and I do not know Judge Marcus.  I would be interested in learning from his perspective.  I will address the involvement of the legal professionals at the Gardnerian PAS Conference separately.

Of note is that two medical physicians, M.D. doctors, are headlining the conference, but you’d never know that just by reading their flyer.  One’s listed as “Professor” with no degree listing, and one’s listed as Dr. with no degree listing, and he’s presented as an expert in “Psychology.”

I assert that the failure to identify their professional degree is a misrepresentation of their professional background, and in Dr. Miller’s case may be an intentional misrepresentation in order to present as a more credible expert in “Psychology” when, in truth, he is an M.D. internal medicine and emergency room physician.  He may be a very skilled internal medicine physician and ER doctor, apparently even teaching medicine at Harvard Medical School, and I’m assuming it would be internal medicine and emergency room medicine.

None of that professional background, however, is relevant to clinical psychology, family conflict, and family therapy.

I did a google search on Steve Miller, M.D.  Here is his bio from another “parental alienation” conference.

Steven Miller, M.D. bio

STEVEN MILLER, M. D.
Dr. Miller has degrees in both Psychology and Medicine from Brown University and did residency training at Brown University and Harvard Medical School. For more than 30 years he was on the teaching faculty at Harvard Medical School. He is board certified in both Internal Medicine and Emergency Medicine; in addition, he has many years of experience practicing Behavioral Medicine — a specialty that focuses on the interface between medicine and psychology. That background is particularly relevant to child maltreatment, child protection, child alignment, parental alienation, pathological enmeshment, and related issues since those clinical conditions are very much related to behavior, including dysfunctional, pathological, and abusive behavior. Likewise, he has several decades of experience practicing Forensic Medicine. A popular speaker, he has directed several hundred continuing education courses for physicians and other clinicians and presented over one thousand lectures on clinical reasoning, clinical problem-solving, and clinical decision-making. An internationally-known expert on alienation and estrangement – and how to distinguish one from the other – he is also an experienced expert witness, litigation consultant, and trial strategist.

So, let’s walk through this.  He has “degrees in both Psychology and Medicine” but I only see the M.D. listed.  That’s his medical degree.  What is his “Psychology” degree?  Is it a bachelor’s degree from Brown University before going on for his medical degree?  I’d like to find out more about that, what is his “Psychology” degree?

Because if it’s just a bachelor’s degree in Psychology, he’s no more qualitifed than my daughter  is in Psychology. She has a BA in Psychology too.  If he has a Master’s degree in Psychology, then why isn’t he listing it? 

Oh well, let’s see what he actually does for a living.

“For more than 30 years he was on the teaching faculty at Harvard Medical School.”

Very impressive.  That’s a physician.  So whatever his “Psychology” degree is, it’s not what he actually does.  He’s a physician.  What type of physician?

“He is board certified in both Internal Medicine and Emergency Medicine;”

That has nothing to do with psychology.  If he is teaching at Harvard Medical School, it’s about “Internal Medicine and Emergency Medicine” not psychology.

I am concerned that Steven Miller, M.D. may be overstating his professional background and qualifications in professional psychology, altering or obscuring the truth in order to gain personal credibility that is not justified by professional training and background.

He is a physician, “board certified in Internal Medicine and Emergency Medicine.”  I’m not seeing where his professional background is relevant to his opinions about matters of clinical psychology, family conflict, and family therapy.

“…in addition, he has many years of experience practicing Behavioral Medicine — a specialty that focuses on the interface between medicine and psychology.”

So if he is a physician, board certified in “Internal Medicine and Emergency Medicine,” then he is coming from the “Medicine” side of that “interface between medicine and psychology,” and I would be on the “Psychology” side of that interface.

I am a clinical psychologist.  I come from Children’s Hospitals.  I know what Behavioral Medicine is.  The operative word in Behavioral Medicine is “Medicine.”  It is medically involved applied behavioral principles.  The school of psychotherapy for Behavioral Medicine is behavioral psychology, Behavioral Medicine is the “behavioral psychology” part of medicine.

I am a trained behavior therapist.  In fact, I’m an exceptionally well-trained behavioral psychologist. 

Good idea, Dr. Miller, let’s use the principles of behavioral medicine.  Let’s start by identifying the cue structure for the pathology, you know, the “stimulus control” for the behavior.  We can do that with a behavior-chain interview.  Or would you prefer to do a Functional Behavioral Analysis (FBA) instead?

Behavioral medicine?  You want to apply that, Dr. Miller?  Fine by me.  Start with identifying the cue structure and reinforcers for the behavior, that would be Applied Behavioral Analysis, or you can look at the function served by the behavior, that would be a Functional Behavioral Analysis.  I’m the psychology side of that interface,

Prior to my doctoral degree and practice as a clinical psychologist, I received prior training for a Master’s degree in Clinical-Community Psychology.  I then received an additional four years of doctoral training in Psychology at Pepperdine University; the doctoral program is a Psy.D., which is the most advanced degree possible in clinical psychology pathology and its treatment… Not an M.D., not a medical degree, a Psy.D. a Psychology Doctorate.

A PsyD sacrifices coursework in research and statistics for additional training in pathology and its treatment.  When it comes to pathology and treatment, a PsyD degree is the top tier clinical psychologist.  I have a Psy.D. in clinical psychology from Pepperdine University, where I was trained on the family systems therapy track.  I am a trained family systems therapist, with doctoral coursework in family systems therapy supported by placements in practicums, clinical internships, and post-doctoral training.

It’s nice that Steve Miller, M.D. who appears to be an excellent internal medicine and emergency room physician, also has some background experience in the field of behavioral medicine.  That’s nice.  That hardly qualifies him as an “expert” in Psychology.

What is your degree in Psychology, Dr. Miller?  Is it a bachelor’s degree?  You indicate in your bio that you have “degrees in both Psychology and Medicine from Brown University” – a single university.  Is your degree in Psychology your bachelor’s degree?

My daughter has a bachelor’s degree in psychology.   You should invite her to your Conference.

Seriously, Dr. Miller.  Tell me you are not claiming to be an “expert” in Psychology because you have a bachelor’s degree in psychology?  No, please, tell me that’s not true.

If you are claiming to be an “expert” in Psychology because you have a bachelor’s degree in Psychology, I am going to assert that you are misrepresenting your professional qualifications.

My doctorate degree in Clinical Psychology included a year of pre-doctoral internship training at the APA accredited internship program at Children’s Hospital of Los Angeles (CHLA) in clinical child and family psychology.  I then received an additional year of post-doctoral training at Children’s Hospital of Los Angeles, switching from spina bifida to pediatric cancer as my medical rotation, and focusing on ADHD as my primary mental health pathology.

And do you know what, Dr. Miller?  My training at CHLA included training (and experience) with the diagnosis of Munchausen Syndrome by Proxy (DSM-5: Factitious Disorder Imposed on Another).  That’s right, I am a top tier expert in Munchusen by proxy.

Where do you think Munchausen by proxy shows up?  Children’s Hospitals, right.  The early medical people can’t figure out what’s going on medically, so they keep passing it up for diagnostic analysis, trying to figure out what’s going on.  Ultimately it arrives at the top, the Children’s Hospital.  At that point, we have a thick-thick medical chart with no clear diagnosis, lots of tests, nothing showing up.

Call for a psych consult, it may be Munchausen by proxy.  So the treating physician calls down to the Psychology Department at the Children’s Hospital requesting a “psych consult” for possible Munchausen by proxy.  Who is that?  Who is that “psych consult” person the physician calls for?

Me.  That would be, me.

Pediatric psychologists at Children’s Hospitals are THE most expert people on the planet regarding the diagnosis of Munchausen Syndrome by Proxy (DSM-5: Factitious Disorder Imposed on Another).

So with all due respect to your medical degree, Dr. Miler, and your specialty in internal medicine and emergency room medicine, I’m going to assert as a clinical child and family psychologist, that my background as a pediatric clinical psychologist at two separate Children’s Hospitals is more relevant professional experience than being board certified in internal medicine and emergency medicine.

Also, I have direct trauma experience, working directly with child abuse trauma in the foster care system.  I was the Clinical Director for a three-university collaborative assessment and treatment center for children in the foster care system.  That’s child abuse pathology in the foster care system, Dr. Miller. The children in the foster care system are there because of child abuse.

I’m the guy who led the treatment teams for that, all the assessment, diagnosis, and treatment for the child and family, that would be me.  Clinical Director, three-university assessment and treatment center for children in the foster care system.

So when DCS removed children and placed them in foster care because of child abuse, Dr. Miller, they sent the children, parents, and foster parents to me, at our clinic, for assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of complex trauma and attachment pathology surrounding child abuse.

“That background is particularly relevant to child maltreatment, child protection, child alignment, parental alienation, pathological enmeshment, and related issues since those clinical conditions are very much related to behavior, including dysfunctional, pathological, and abusive behavior.”

Is it?  I’m going to dispute you on that Dr. Miller. 

From my rofessional background as a clinical psychologist with both Children’s Hospitals and “Behavioral Medicine,” and serving as the Clinical Director for an assessment and treatment center for children in the foster care system – actual child abuse trauma… they’re not the same.

Not anywhere close to the same.

To work with child abuse trauma, you need actual real-world training in complex trauma and child abuse.  Not “behavioral medicine.” Nope.  Not enough.  Not anywhere near enough.

It’d be analogous to asking a physician’s assistant in the local general practitioner’s office to do open heart surgery.  No…, a cardiac surgeon should do open heart surgery, not a physician’s assistant at the GP’s office.

It’s nice that you have some background in behavioral medicine, that’s sweet.  That is not professional-level expertise in trauma and child abuse.  If you want top-tier expertise in trauma and child abuse, go to someone who has assessed, diagnosed, and treated childhood complex trauma, attachment pathology, and child abuse… like me.

I’ve done that.  My professional background as a clinical psychologist includes directing the treatment team assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of complex child abuse trauma in the foster care system. That would be me.

I am also a family systems therapist, trained in all three sub-domains of family systems therapy, Structural (Minuchin), Strategic (Haley, Madanes), and Bowen’s foundational models for family systems therapy (Bowen) – as well as Satir, Framo, Boszormenyi-Nagy, and others.

Dr. Miller, did you know that Boszormenyi-Nagy has literally written the book on loyalty invisible loyalties coverconflicts in the family?He also developed an approach to family therapy called “Contextual Family Therapy.” 

So what do you think, Dr. Miller?  Do you think it would be important to know about how family loyalties operate if you’re going to be an “expert” in psychology and family conflict?

Do you think it would be valuable to know Boszormenyi-Nagy and Contextual Family Therapy?

It is.

What a surprise.  Who would have thought knowing about family loyalties and loyalty conflicts would be useful in treating loyalty conflicts in the family.  You are an expert in Boszormenyi-Nagy aren’t you, Dr. Miller?  Because you wouldn’t be an “internationally-known expert” in family conflict pathology and not know about family loyalty conflicts, would you, Dr. Miller.  

And Dr. Miller is what passes for an “expert” in forensic psychology world, an internal medicine and ER physician is the “expert” in psychology because he has a bachelor’s degree in Psychology.

Okay.

“Likewise, he has several decades of experience practicing Forensic Medicine.”

Forensic medicine.  Not forensic psychology – forensic medicine.  That means court-involved medicine.  He’s an internal medicine and ER physician (“He is board certified in both Internal Medicine and Emergency Medicine”).

So he’s doing forensic medicine? Of what relevance is forensic medicine to attachment trauma pathology and family systems therapy? Does he conduct child custody evaluations? Probably not, otherwise he’d say he does forensic psychology, and besides, he’s a physician not a mental health professional.

It sounds like he’s trying to obscure and confuse about his actual background to make it appear he is more credible than he is.  If that is the case, that is truly an unfortunate professional standard of practice, to mislead the public about one’s true qualifications and the limits to those qualifications.

I don’t practice medicine, and Dr. Miller should probably not practice psychology unless he has the background education and training to do so.

“A popular speaker, he has directed several hundred continuing education courses for physicians and other clinicians and presented over one thousand lectures on clinical reasoning, clinical problem-solving, and clinical decision-making.”

A popular speaker is not relevant to his professional qualifications.  I see no professional qualifications in professional psychology whatsoever, yet he is claiming to be an “expert” in “Psychology” – right there, under his name, without specifying that his “Dr.” is as a medical physician – an internal medicine and ER doctor.

A “popular” speaker can be selling snake-oil from the back of their wagon, drawing crowds at every stop.  A “popular speaker” is not a professional qualification, and so far I see no professional qualifications in professional psychology.

He has presented over a thousand lectures on “clinical reasoning, clinical problem solving, and clinical decision-making.”  That’s nice.  How many lectures has he presented on the DSM-5 diagnosis of pathology?  My guess is zero, he is an internal medicine and emergency room physician.

Over a thousand lectures on reasoning and problem solving.  He must like this topic a lot.  I’ve listened to him on this some, very erudite, and way too complex for practical application.  We cannot ask all these mental health people to learn complex reasoning analyses.  That is simply not practical. 

Thanks for the suggestion, Dr. Miller, but this is a pathology requiring diagnosis, not a philosophical discussion for Socrates.

I suppose if you care about logical reasoning fallacies in decision-making, Dr. Miller is your guy.  Doesn’t particularly interest me.  I understand what he’s saying, it just doesn’t lead to anything practical… just kind of his own special thing, I guess.

When we have our Christmas party, I suspect Dr. Miller will be over by the punch bowl muttering about the logical fallacies of Santa coming down the chimney, “The chubbiness quotient is inconsistent with the chimney portal dimensions, the chimney protal will not support the mass to energy ratio needed for transportation of said Santa.” 

Okay, great Steve.  How’s the wife?

High Quality Specialist

I’ve watched some of Dr. Miller’s YouTube stuff as well.  He calls for the creation of a high-quality professional for this pathology.

That would be me.

Seriously, I am EXACTLY the person he’s calling for.

I am a clinical psychologist, Psy.D., one of the best.  I have extensive clinical training in all forms of pathology, including complex trauma and child abuse. I have background training in the assessment and diagnosis of delusioal pathology.  I am extensively well-trained in family systems therapy; all approaches… and… I’ve been working with this specific court-involved family conflict for over ten years now.

That’s one of his qualifications he proposes, extensive experience with the pathology.  That’s me too, over ten years experience.  I entered court-involved clinical psychology back in late-2008,

It’s a mess over here, this forensic psychology world.   Everyone chased this white rabbit of “parental alientation” and fell down the rabbit hole into an awful trauma world of parallel process.

 

I’ve been working with this court-involved family conflict for over ten years, advocatign consistently for a return to established knowledge.  You can see handouts up on my website from 2013 that are saying exactly the same things I’m saying know, Bowlby, Minuchin, Beck.

That was one of Dr. Miller’s criteria for top-tier expertise, that the clinical psychologist had extensive experience working specifically with this type of family pathology – that would be me too – Dr. Childress has over ten years experience working with specifically this type of court-involved family conflict pathology.

I meet Dr. Miller’s exact criteria.  Consider…

I have background as a PsyD clinical psychologist trained at a top graduate school.  I am specialized in child and family pathology and treatment.  Trained at Children’s Hospitals in Muchausen by proxy (DSM-5: Factitious Disorder Imposed on Another).

I have over 12 years of experience in rating delusional pathology, trained annually by UCLA and the Diagnostic Unit at the Brentwood VA in using the Brief Psychiatric Scale (BPRS) in rating psychotic and delusional pathology.

Vitae Entry:  9/85 -9/98 Research Associate
UCLA Neuropsychiatric Institute
Principle Investigator: Keith Nuechterlein, Ph.D.
Area: Longitudinal study of initial-onset schizophrenia

I also have trauma and child abuse diagnosis and treatment background:

Vitae Entry 10/06 -6/08: Clinical Director
START Pediatric Neurodevelopmental Assessment and Treatment Center
California State University, San Bernardino Institute of Child Development and Family Relations

Clinical director for an early childhood assessment and treatment center providing comprehensive developmental assessment and psychotherapy services to children ages 0-5 years old. Directed the clinical operations, clinical staff, and the provision of comprehensive psychological assessment and treatment services across clinic-based, home-based, and school-based services. A three-university collaboration with speech and language services through the University of Redlands, occupational therapy through Loma Linda University, and psychology through Calif. State University, San Bernardino.

I am exactly – exactly – the specialized advanced-knowledge professional Dr. Miller is calling for.   “That’ me.”

I’m surely doesn’t mean that internal medicine physicians and ER doctors represent this top tier of professional expertise complex family conflict surrounding divorce.

Clearly, the expertise would be from clinical psychologists, with a PsyD degree representing the most advanced.  We’d want extensive experience with child and family therapy, extensively grounded knowledge of attachment pathology, with delusoinal pathology experience, a complex trauma background, and child abuse, and solidly grounded knowledge for all of the principle schools of family systems therapy.

That would be a top-tier professional.

That’s me.  That is exactly my background.

I am exactly the top-tier professional expertise that Dr. Miller is calling for.

Top Tier Professional

So… Dr. Miller, listen carefully to what this sought-for high-level professional expertise is saying to you…

Stop using the construct of “parental alienation” in a professional capacity.

Doing that, using that construct, is harmful to the patients.

You are an internal medicine and ER physician.  A wonderful good one, I’m certain.  Your ideas about logical fallacies are fascinating.

The expertise in professional psychology that you are seeking is telling you, as an internal medicine physician and ER doctor, to stop using the construct of “parental alienation” in a professional capacity.

Dr. Miller, with all due respect to your medical degree and “board certifications in Internal Medicine and Emergency Medicine,” please use the standard and established constructs of clinical psychology when discussing clinical psychopathology.  It becomes less confusing to the general public and to the courts when we ground ourselves in the scientifically established knowledge of the discipline (as required by Standard 2.04 of the APA ethics code).

APA Ethics Code
Standard 2.04 Bases for Scientific and Professional Judgments
Psychologists’ work is based upon established scientific and professional knowledge of the discipline.

That would be Bowlby, Minuchin, Beck, van der Kolk, and. Tronick; attachment, family systems therapy, personality disorder pathology, complex trauma, and the neuro-development of the brain in the parent-child relationship.

Dr. Miller, I’m not seeing reference to your professional background in any of those areas.  I’m not sure you’re competent at a basic level, needless to say an “expert” in “Psychology.”

Right below your picture there, Dr. Miller… it says “Psychology” – that’s not true, is it, Dr. Miller.  You’re actually a physician with board certifications in Internal Medicine and Emergency Medicine, aren’t you?  And your “degree” in Psychology is just a bachelor’s degree, isn’t it?  And you just have some opinions about logical fallacies, don’t you, so you’re kind of attaching those to a pathology you don’t actually understand very well.

And you’re a headlining “expert” at the Dublin Conference.

Dr. Miller, this is by instruction from that top-tier professional expertise you’re seeking (you know, the person who is a combination of top-level clinical psychology background, background expertise in Munchausen by proxy, background expertise in family systems therapy (all forms), extensive background in delusional pathology, and background expertise in complex trauma, child abuse, and attachment pathology)… the correct terms to use from family systems therapy are that the child is being “triangulated” into the spousal conflict through the formation of a “cross-generational coalition” of the child with the allied parent, resulting in an “emotional cutoff” in the child’s relationship to the targeted parent.

There is zero need to resort to the term “parental alienation” in your descriptions of the pathology.

Alternatively, Dr. Miller, if you choose to apply the information sets from attachment and complex trauma, then the professional-level description of the pathology becomes the trans-generational transmission of attachment trauma from the childhood of the allied narcissistic-borderline parent to the current family relationships, mediated by the personality disorder pathology of the allied parent that is itself a product of this parent’s childhood attachment trauma.

Again, there is zero need to resort to using the term “parental alienation.” The pathology is fully describable using the established constructs of professional psychology without resorting to creating a “new form of pathology” with entirely new and unique symptom identifiers.  And I would suggest to you that you are a little beyond the scope of your training and competence to be suggesting we adopt new forms of psychological psychopathology.

Dr. Miller, I shouldn’t even have to say this to you, but it is beneath professional standards of practice to NOT apply the established knowledge of professional psychology, and to mislead the public into believing “new forms of pathology” that are not sufficiently grounded in the scientific literature for professional acceptance.

APA Ethics Code
Standard 2.04 Bases for Scientific and Professional Judgments
Psychologists’ work is based upon established scientific and professional knowledge of the discipline.

The “established scientific and professional knowledge of the discipline” is not Richard Gardner, Dr. Miller.  It’s Bowlby, Minuchin, Beck, van der Kolk, Tronick… Million, Linehan, Stern, Siegel, Fonagy, Kernberg, Bowen, Madanes…

Not Richard Gardner and PAS, Dr. Miller.  You will have all the same logical fallacy arguments when you based your descriptions of the pathology in established constructs and principles of professional psychology as you do proposing that everyone accept a “new form of psychopathology” developed unilaterally by a psychiatrist (M.D. doctor) in 1985 and which has been rejected by both the American Psychological Association and the American Psychiatric Association.

Dr. Miller, I am in full agreement with the American Psychiatric Association when they rejected “parental alienation” as a valid diagnostic construct.

Do you, – an internal medicine physician and ER doctor -, dispute the carefully considred decision of the DSM-5 diagnostic committees of the American Psychiatric Association regarding what is and is not an established pathology?

Because if you accept the decision of the American Psychiatric Association… then there is no such pathology as “parental alienation” – so stop using the construct in a professional capacity.  Also, please start clearly identifying yourself as an internal medicine physician and ER physician, not as an “expert” in “Psychology.”

Dr. Miller, I have professional obligations under Standard 1.04 of the APA ethics code.  I understand that you are not a psychologist and that the ethical standards of professional psychology do not apply to you.  I also consider my ethical obligations under Standard 1.04 to be discharged.

I realize that professional psychology is not your field, Dr. Miller, and that you are an internal medicine physician who is opining on matters of clinical psychology and family therapy, beyond the scope of your training and background, so your confusion about professional constructs might be understandable for a limited time.  But professionals are required to apply the “established scientific and professional knowledge of the discipline,” and I am asking you to do so.

APA Ethics Code
Standard 2.04 Bases for Scientific and Professional Judgments
Psychologists’ work is based upon established scientific and professional knowledge of the discipline.

I know that the ethics code for professional psychology doesn’t apply to you, Dr. Miller, because you are a physician with a specialty in internal medicine and emergency room medicine, not psychology.  But if you are going to enter the realm of clinical psychology, Dr. Miller, at least practice at the level of a professional over here, at least abide by the APA ethics code for the “Bases of Scientific and Professional Judgement

The “established scientific and professional knowledge is not Richard Gardner, Dr. Miller, it’s Bowlby, Minuchin, Beck…

I am exactly – exactly – the high-level professional experience you’re asking for.

No more Richard Gardner, please.  That is beneath professional standards of practice.

“An internationally-known expert on alienation and estrangement – and how to distinguish one from the other – he is also an experienced expert witness, litigation consultant, and trial strategist.”

An “expert on alienation” and “estrangement” – yet neither of those supposed pathologies exist, citations requested for these supposed new pathologies, Dr. Miller.

There is no such thing as “estrangement” – you should become familiar with Dr. Tronick’s work at Harvard on the breach-and-repair sequence.  There are only repaired breaches and unrepaired breaches – unrepaired breaches are the “ugly” that Dr. Tronick describes, not some “estrangement” pathology you are creating.

There are parent-child conflicts over in juvenile justice pathology, over in school-based psychology, over in trauma psychology, over in autism and developmental psychology, and in family systems therapy with normal-range families.  These breaches to the parent-child bond are either repaired or non-repaired.

There is no pathology of “parental alienation” – there is no pathology of “estrangement” – please stop making up new forms of pathology.

This is a direct instruction from exactly the high-level professional expertise you are asking for.

I am a clinical psychologist (PsyD)

My specialty is child and family therapy.

I am a trained and experienced family systems therapist in multiple schools of family systems therapy (Structural, Stragtegic, Bowen).

I am extensively trained and experienced in the rating of delusional pathology (12 years on a schizophrenia research project at UCLA)

I am trained and experienced in Munchausen by proxy, DSM-5 Factitious Disorder Imposed on Another (pediatric psychologist at Children’s Hospitals).

I am extensively trained and experienced in complex trauma, child abuse, and attachment trauma pathology.

And I have over ten years of experience treating exactly this court-involved family conflict pathology.

That knowledge and expertise, Dr. Miller, is instructing you from that knowledge and expertise, please stop using the construct of “parental alienation” in a professional capacity.

Please properly identify your professional qualifications.  You are not an “expert” in psychology.  You are an internal medicine and ER physician with wonderful ideas about logical fallacies.  You are not an expert in “Psychology” as the flyer for the upcoming Dublin conference suggests, you are misleading the public as to your professional qualifications.

What is your Psychology degree, Dr. Miller? (“Dr. Miller has degrees in both Psychology and Medicine from Brown University”).  Are you claiming to be an “expert” in Psychology because you have a bachelor’s degree in psychology?  Is that your standard for what it takes to be an “expert” in Psychology?

Craig Childress, Psy.D.
Clinical Psychologist, PSY 18857

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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