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Divorce Attorney Elise Mitchell's Private Files Document Blow Jobs to Judges

Reporters: Catholic Church Settlements Link  Family Courts to Child Abuse Sex Scandals and Sex Trafficking Rings Paid By Sales of Family Homes

As mothers, fathers and gangs of reporters continue to sift through private settlements made by the Catholic Church to protect priests who had sexually abused children for decades, a startling link has been discovered that connects judges and family law attorneys to sex trafficking and pedophile rings where children are taken from their families during high conflict divorce cases from California to South Carolina.

Papers and secret sources indicate Judge Peter McBrien reportedly used the prestige of his office to traffic children in Sacramento’s family courts through an orphanage known as Sacramento Children’s Home, but McBrien didn’t stop there, He used his contacts in Napa, Contra Costa, Orange and Santa Clara County to refer families to private judge cases where secret proceedings resulted in lawyers using high asset divorce cases to legally terminate custody of protective parents. These legal proceedings, often held in lawyer offices appear to result in children being sent to live with abusive parents who control their every move and prohibit communication with the parent who sought to expose abuse.

Settlement papers connected to St. Mary’s church in Gilroy California show children were placed in the county’s orphanage describe horrific abuses of drugging, and financially destroying children who were reportedly taken from Child Protective Services (CPS) or from families divorcing in Santa Clara and San Benito Counties. Attorneys Richard Roggia, James Cox and Sharon Roper’s names appear connected to some of the most horrific abuses.

These papers also reveal that in  San Mateo and Santa Clara Counties attorney Bradford Baugh, Lynne Yates Carter, Elise Mitchell, Joseph Russoniello , Hector Moreno and Donelle Morgan appear to be  connected to an auto body shop that was trafficking young immigrant women from Sweden and Italy to act as  “nannies” for Silicon Valley tech executives engaging in some of the worst child and sex abuse cases in the state. 

Funding for the trafficking and child abuse enterprises appears to be coming from the conversation of family home and business equity that is being funneled through California’s family courts and Catholic Church “donations”. 

In Los Gatos. California papers indicate attorneys Walter Hammon, Rebekah Frye  and Catherine Gallagher have been using connections to the local judiciary and powerful real estate developers to raise money through donations made to St. Mary’s and Shir Hadash that have gone to fund supervised visitation centers, reunification camps and unlicensed non- profit groups to brainwash children in order to isolate them from families who could protect them. 

Ten years after the Catholic Church sex abuse scandal broke on the front pages of the Boston Globe, the full extent of harm inflicted on children through the nation’s churches , synagogues and family courts continues to be secreted by lawyers and judges who knew and who allowed these horrific crimes against children to continue. 

Lawyers names associated with these settlements are now being redacted and reviewed in a manner that would allow children and parents to collect monetary awards, which many describe as insufficient given the stolen innocence these lawyers, judges, politicians and religious leaders took as they sought only to profit and advance their own careers. 

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MLFs Expose Judges & Morgan Hill Lawyer Laura Perry in  Silicon Valley  Guns & Sex Trafficking Ring

Sex Trafficking, Drugs & Guns In Silicon Valley Divorces

Morgan Hill attorney Laura Perry just tied Morgan Hill’s most nefarious MLF, Heidi Vlf, to a criminal enterprise trafficking teenage girls, guns and designer drugs through the county’s foster care system and local family courts. 

Taxpayers and Victims determined to remove Santa Clara County District Attorney and Judge James Towery from the county payroll, found divorce files in the offices of Laura Perry that link south county to court corruption that is separating families and trafficking young wealthy women whose parents ended up in the courtrooms of Judge Patricia Lucas, James Towery, Christopher Rudy, Mary Arand, Stuart Scott, Theodore Zayner and Mark Pierce. during their divorce or civil cases involving Silicon Valley start ups and tech businesses. 

The criminal enterprise apparently operates in divorce cases where judges appoint lawyers for children, or to act as private judges. Heather Allan, Rebekah Frye,  BJ Fadem, Jessica Huey, Bradford Baugh, Walter Hammon and Bradford Baugh are the core lawyers working to use domestic violence to separate children from their parents and into the county’s foster care program. 

Once children are in these programs, the county’s local Standing Order allow county employees to order medical procedures and drugs for children without parental consent. 

An audit of family court orders show these judges routinely issue orders for medical treatments, supervised visitation centers  and detention centers where they hold a financial interest. 

Judges currently earn $180- 220,000 in Santa Clara, a fraction of what is needed to live a middle class lifestyle in Silicon  Valley. This pay gap as left judges rip for corruption, kickbacks and sex favors. 

Perry is also linked to gun runners and abusers operating out of Gilroy, Morgan Hill and San Martin.  A couple known as “Heidi and Scott” have reportedly been running guns from barns and outbuildings in Santa Clara’s most rural areas using homeless and mentally ill populations to hide the gun, drug and sex trafficking activity. 

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When Sex Abuse Victims Aren

What Happens When Sex Abuse Victims Aren’t Supported And Nurtured?

When Sex Abuse Victims Aren't Supported And Nurtured

 

Three weeks ago, I wanted your decision to call off the engagement, to be about me-about something I did or didn’t do.  Three weeks ago, I began the inner dialogue of playing the ‘what if’ game:  “What if I had sent a more loving text?”; “What if I had sat closer to him at soccer practice?”; “What if I had planned a romantic weekend instead of buying Valentine’s Day gifts?”

Three weeks ago, I was drowning in self-doubt and self-blame. I thought about all of my flaws: my middle-aged after three children body, my short-temper, my overly analytical mind.

Three weeks ago I needed something tangible, something I could isolate- an exact moment when I destroyed the relationship. This discovery would empower me: it would give me control.  If I had this tidbit, then I would not be a victim again. I would protect myself.  I would use this as a reminder to what I had learned so many times: never be vulnerable; always be vigilant.

My vigilance was complete and steady until recently. 

I fully blame the media for my change in heart. I was inundated with another v-word- vulnerability.  Vulnerability was all the buzz when it came to unlocking the secrets to finding and keeping love.

Studies were conducted, articles and books were written, T.V. shows and documentaries were made. All of these purported the same message: Vulnerability is key to a true connection.  But, I am a hard sell.  It wasn’t until I went to see a long-awaited film that I gave this notion some real thought.

In late October, on a really bad date, I went to see the film A Star Is Born. I was absolutely stunned by the performances both actors gave. It wasn’t just the vocals or the acting- although both were superb-rather, it was the lesson they learned.

The characters, both struggling with their own demons, together find their way out of hell by letting down their guard and trusting the other. The scenes where Ally and Jackson allowed themselves to be vulnerable were both uncomfortable and beautiful to me.  I wanted to be Ally—not just because of her voice and marriage to Jackson- I longed to know what it was like to trust someone enough to be completely vulnerable.

When Sex Abuse Victims Aren’t Supported And Nurtured

Vulnerability is often learned at the hand of trauma.

I have learned this more times than I will ever admit. Sometimes it is extreme like sexual and physical abuse and sometimes it is a matter of being demeaned, humiliated, ignored.  And unlike adults, children are not allowed or not encouraged to feel how they feel. They bury the feelings of betrayal, confusion, anger, and rejection. Or if they are allowed to feel some of the emotions, it is not under the care of a professional or a trusted adult.

What makes childhood abuse so detrimental to future relationships is the victim learning the hard way that you cannot trust those who were supposed to have protected you.  It is the memory of recalling what it was like to be in a situation in which you have no control and no one would answer your calls for aid.  It is the anger that comes with knowing that telling about the abuse will make things worse and leave even more people broken and hurt.

Children learn quickly.  The subtext that they pick up on really quickly is this:  society blames victims- especially women.

When a woman is raped, how often does she feel the scrutiny of outfits and interactions? When a woman is abused by her partner, what gossip does she hear about her inabilities and insanity? When a woman is mentally terrorized, how often does she see another rewarded for her tenacity to go through the hell?

The blame game impacts every young woman-those who have experienced abuse and those who have not.

It is extremely common for trauma victims to blame themselves because they are looking for a defense mechanism against the most awful feeling in the world: powerlessness. It is also extremely common for all humans to want to understand. Children who have known trauma, don’t often get to address these issues.

When a caretaker or parent doesn’t ensure that these feelings are addressed, the child will find a resolution: self-blame.  The repercussions will certainly continue if the victim (If we) never come to know that it wasn’t our fault; it wasn’t our choice; it wasn’t what we deserved.

What I deserve (d) was the ability to be vulnerable, to have parents and caring adults protect me from the evil that targeted me.  I deserved to be believed, supported, and nurtured when these same adults failed to protect me. I didn’t deserve to have my pain buried, to have my self-esteem diminished, to have my self-love lessened. I deserved complete and unfaltering love.

I believe in healing.  I believe that trauma is only a part of who we are.  I believe we have to stop re-traumatizing ourselves.  I believe we have to stop repeating the cycle of pain.  I believe that we can see ourselves as brave warriors and not victims.  And I most definitely still believe in love.

The post What Happens When Sex Abuse Victims Aren’t Supported And Nurtured? appeared first on Divorced Moms.

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