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4 Tips for Keeping Your Family Intact During the Coronavirus

4 Tips for Keeping Your Family Intact During the Coronavirus

Every unhappy family may be unique, but right now, a lot of families are unhappy in a similar way for similar reasons. Here are tips for keeping your family intact during the Coronavirus.

The post 4 Tips for Keeping Your Family Intact During the Coronavirus appeared first on Divorce Magazine.

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Surviving Marriage During the Coronavirus Quarantine

Surviving Marriage During the Coronavirus Quarantine

Living in such close quarters during coronavirus may cause some strife during marriage. Here are tips on surviving marriage during qurantine.

The post Surviving Marriage During the Coronavirus Quarantine appeared first on Divorce Magazine.

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Disbarred Divorce Attorney DIED of Coronavirus in Santa Clara: Contact Tracing  Begins

 
​Nearly  three years after Lynne Yates Carter taught lawyers how to earn more in fee awards at a lawyer training led by Judge James Towery and Justice Mary Greenwood at the Santa Clara County bar association , Lynne Yates Carter was disbarred and has now reportedly died. Her death is rumored to be connected to COVID-19 and contact tracing of the county’s  dirtiest divorce lawyers has begun.

Yates- Carter was celebrated in the local family law community for getting the wife of lawyer Richard Falcone sanctioned over $1 million dollars and declared vexatious in the Falcone v Fyke divorce case.  This case became the flagship for divorce lawyers and family court judges operating a criminal enterprise out of the area’s family courts where lawyers who are part of a criminal enterprise convinced clients to use a fake judge, claiming a lawyer overseeing a divorce instead of a duly elected judge ”  will be cheaper, faster and more private”, Minor’s counsel appointments are pimped out to local judges in return for appointments to act in the best interest of the children whose parents get caught in crosshairs of this criminal enterprise.. Lynne Yates Carter and her corrupt associate,  Tracy Duell Cazes.  wrote the playbook on this corrupt practice. Duell- Cazes continues to benefit by acting as a private judge where she can earn $5 million a year doing very little work..   

Contact tracing related  to Lynne’s death has turned up far more than coronavirus super spreaders.. Emergency orders in the county  have closed the courts  and county buildings.  These closures have reduced opportunities for lawyers to hold secret meetings that historically have provided an important tool for the most corrupt lawyers using the public courthouse to conduct their criminal conduct.  This conduct has now drawn the   attention of federal investigators who  are now looking into  family court cases where Yates Cater and her associates,  including Duell Cazes and Kathryn Schlepphorst,  appear to be at the center of the scandal.  

In what appears to be a deathbed confession, Yates Carter revealed corruption where divorce lawyers and family court judges have  turned a blind eye to child abuse and money laundering in attorney trust accounts. . Once she was disbarred Lynne Yates Carter reportedly warned  Elise Mitchell and Sharon Roper that the COVID-19 crisis could significantly impact the enterprise as  real property equity in the area dries up and court business  essentially grinds to a  halt. Further, Shelia Pott , a loan manager, recently lost an important appeal and is worried the loans she wrote for area lawyers and judges as kickbacks for favorable rulings in her own divorce case are now on the  radar of federal investigators at the DOJ. 

Jason Pintar has also been exposed for his role in the darkest part of the  enterprise after  it was discovered that cases Pintar was involved in with Constance Carpenter, Nat Hales, Richard Roggia , Laura Perry and Annie Fortino appear to be related to  sex trafficking rings revealed in cases before Judge Mary Ann  Grilli in 2014 and Judge Towery in 2017. Pintar appears to have  teamed up with Laura Perry and Annie Fortino  who have connections to the Gilroy Police and local politicians.   

 Twenty years ago, attorney Ed Mills  was  appointed in the Falcone v, Fyke divorce case as a referee/ Private Judge.  Ms. Fkye had to represent herself,  Over 20 years,  Lynne  Yates Carter,  is believed to have brought in cases that have generated  millions of dollars in fees to benefit  private judges James Cox, Ed Mills, Nat Hales, Sharon Roper, Michael Smith, Richard Roggia, Ed Berra and, Tracy Duell- Cazes..  

An attorney,  believed to be David Patton.  was recently overheard speaking to a staffer claiming Yates Carter’s death was timely as her recent disbarment threatened to expose private judging, attorney trust account abuses   and minor’s counsel appointments in the county. 
A whistleblower who contacted this website noted that family law attorneys are worried COVID-19 will expose mass corruption in the family courts in a manner that will result in the termination of what surely was the golden era for corruption in California’s courts. 

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Coronavirus Legal News Briefing — April 27, 2020

Coronavirus Legal News Briefing — May 5, 2020

Originally published by Amy Starnes.

Editor’s Note: The State Bar of Texas is providing this collection of important links, blog posts, and media stories to keep its members and the public informed of the latest news and resources related to the novel coronavirus outbreak and its impact on the legal community.

Important links

State Bar of Texas Coronavirus Legal Resources Page — Texasbar.com/coronavirus

State Bar of Texas Coronavirus Public Resources Page — Texasbar.com/COVIDHelp

Texas Lawyers’ Assistance Program Well-being Resources page — Texasbar.com/remote-well-being

Law firms are seeing major slowdown in business because of COVID-19, data shows — The shock to the global economy stemming from the COVID-19 pandemic has produced a 40% drop in the number of new legal matters being opened each week in the U.S. compared to late February. — ABA Journal

Covid-19 spurs demand for contract lawyers, recruiters say — Temporary contract attorneys and paralegals are in demand at corporate and government legal departments and law firms. — Bloomberg Law

Pay cuts, layoffs, and more: How law firms are managing the pandemic — A firm-by-firm guide to how law firms are protecting their bottom lines from the economic fallout of the coronavirus. (Subscription required) — Texas Lawyer

Nearly 800 COVID-19 lawsuits have been filed, according to law firm’s tracker — Wondering what kind of lawsuits are being filed in connection with the COVID-19 pandemic? A lawsuit tracker has the answer. — ABA Journal

Divorce cases expected to increase as shelter in place orders lifted in Texas — The expected increase in divorce filings is based on trends in other countries after stay at home orders were relaxed. — The Gilmer Mirror

May 15 hearing set for Texas vote-by-mail arguments — U.S. District Judge Fred Biery has ordered a hearing on expanding vote-by-mail to all Texas voters in advance of the July 14 Democratic Party runoff election, due to fears of coronavirus transmission should in-person voting be required. — Rivard Report

Commentary: What Dallas lawyer who nursed New York coronavirus victims wants you to know about heroes and this disease — “I watched more people in my first shift die of coronavirus than I’ve ever seen die from the flu,” Jim Mullen says from his self-quarantine. — The Dallas Morning News

Supreme Court arguments a tech success, but format strangles usual give-and-take — The U.S. Supreme Court made history Monday. The coronavirus lockdown forced the typically cautious court to hear arguments for the first time via telephone, and to stream the arguments live for the public to hear. — NPR

At least 15 states grant lawsuit protection to long-term care facilities during pandemic — The American Health Care Association is leading a lobbying effort to protect nursing homes and long-term care facilities from legal liability during the COVID-19 pandemic. — ABA Journal

Commentary: How the government will help families affected by COVID-19 — Recently, the Families First Coronavirus Response Act was passed to provide financial assistance. (Subscription required) — Texas Lawyer

Gold’s Gym files for bankruptcy due to coronavirus pandemic (video) — Gold’s Gym, which has operated for more than 50 years, filed for Chapter 11 protection Monday. Clothing retailer J.Crew also announced that it has filed for bankruptcy. — CNN

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To keep up on the latest legal news from around the state, sign up for the State Bar of Texas’ Daily News Briefing by clicking here.

Curated by Texas Bar Today. Follow us on Twitter @texasbartoday.



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Coronavirus Legal News Briefing — April 27, 2020

Coronavirus Legal News Briefing — April 30, 2020

Originally published by Amy Starnes.

Editor’s Note: The State Bar of Texas is providing this collection of important links, blog posts, and media stories to keep its members and the public informed of the latest news and resources related to the novel coronavirus outbreak and its impact on the legal community.

Important links

State Bar of Texas Coronavirus Legal Resources Page — Texasbar.com/coronavirus

State Bar of Texas Coronavirus Public Resources Page — Texasbar.com/COVIDHelp

Texas Lawyers’ Assistance Program Well-being Resources page — Texasbar.com/remote-well-being

Texas AG helped donor fight virus lockout — Records reviewed by The Associated Press show that an exclusive group of Texans stood to benefit when Attorney General Ken Paxton urged a small Colorado county to reverse a public health order during the coronavirus outbreak. — The Associated Press

Texas voters sue over age restrictions for mail-in ballots — Citing the threats of the coronavirus, six Texas voters filed suit in federal court Wednesday challenging restrictions that limit age eligibility for voting by mail to those 65 and older. — The Texas Tribune

Many law firms that applied for paycheck protection loans are still waiting; Texas lawyer sues — One Houston lawyer was so frustrated by delays that he filed would-be class action lawsuits against three banks on behalf of himself and other clients. — ABA Journal

Small Business Administration temporarily limits stimulus loans to small lenders — The Small Business Administration briefly closed applications for emergency small business loans to all but the nation’s smallest lenders on Wednesday. — UPI

Tips for minimizing law firm liability during COVID-19 — As with any significant upheaval, this sudden and radical transformation of the legal profession creates new risk management challenges for law firms. (Subscription required) — Law360

Big Business wants immunity from Covid-19 lawsuits — At issue is how to balance protecting businesses from lawsuits, while enabling justice for customers and workers who in a time of rapidly rising unemployment may not have the option of leaving their jobs for something safer. — The Associated Press

Texas Supreme Court approves July Bar Exam, sets alternative September testing date — The Texas bar examination set for July will continue as scheduled, but an additional testing date also will be offered in September. — Texas Bar Blog

McLennan County judges, court officials prepare for return of jury trials — As Texas and county officials prepare to resume more work under whatever the new normal will look like, judges are realizing McLennan County courtrooms were not built with social distancing in mind. — Waco Tribune-Herald

Supreme Court to begin live oral arguments; here’s how it works — For the first time in its history, the U.S. Supreme Court will hear oral arguments by telephone conference. All nine justices and counsel will participate remotely starting Monday, May 5. — Court TV

COVID-19: Are your constitutional rights quarantined too? — The leading case about restrictions during public health emergencies is the U.S. Supreme Court’s 1905 decision in Jacobson v. Massachusetts. — Tilting the Scales blog

Shared custody in the time of COVID-19: A Q&A with Susan Myres — Houston attorney Susan Myres, president of the AAML, discusses shared custody and the challenges divorced/separated parents face during the time of COVID-19. (Subscription required) — Texas Lawyer

Working from home does not excuse employers from safety responsibility — It is imperative that all employers who employ home workers understand that they still have an obligation to keep all workers safe and they also must keep their Workers’ Compensation insurance in force. — Workplace Safety blog

How opening businesses again will impact your unemployment. Q&A with Texas Workforce Commission (video) — BoShould you go back to work if you fear getting sick? Here are 17 questions we asked the man in charge of Texas unemployment benefits. — KVUE – Austin

Federal government sued for denying stimulus checks to Americans married to undocumented immigrants — The Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund, is alleging that a provision in the $2.2 trillion stimulus package known as the CARES Act that denies the benefit to mixed-status families in unconstitutional. — The Texas Tribune

Judge affirms White House plan to suspend visas for child migrants — A U.S. district judge in Oregon declined late Wednesday to block a White House plan to suspend immigration visas for children of permanent migrant residents due to the coronavirus crisis. — UPI

While volunteering in a NYC pop-up hospital, this Texas law grad learned he had passed the bar — For three weeks, John Kiraly, a May 2019 graduate of the University of North Texas Dallas College of Law, has volunteered with a Florida-based private humanitarian company, Comprehensive Health Services. (Subscription required) — Texas Lawyer

Google zooms in on Zoom with a freebie — Google on Tuesday made its business videoconferencing service free to all users, ramping up competition for Zoom as people flock online to stay connected during the pandemic. — Agence France-Presse

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To keep up on the latest legal news from around the state, sign up for the State Bar of Texas’ Daily News Briefing by clicking here.

Curated by Texas Bar Today. Follow us on Twitter @texasbartoday.



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How Remarried Couples (and All Couples) Can Stay Together Amidst the Coronavirus Pandemic

How Remarried Couples (and All Couples) Can Stay Together Amidst the Coronavirus Pandemic

Even in the best of times, happiness in a second marriage can be difficult to sustain. However, fostering a safe space where you and your partner (and family members) can turn to each other for support, is key to helping you all weather the storm.

The post How Remarried Couples (and All Couples) Can Stay Together Amidst the Coronavirus Pandemic appeared first on Divorce Magazine.

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Coronavirus Legal News Briefing — April 27, 2020

Coronavirus Legal News Briefing — April 27, 2020

Originally published by Amy Starnes.

Editor’s Note: The State Bar of Texas is providing this collection of important links, blog posts, and media stories to keep its members and the public informed of the latest news and resources related to the novel coronavirus outbreak and its impact on the legal community.

Important links

State Bar of Texas Coronavirus Legal Resources Page — Texasbar.com/coronavirus

State Bar of Texas Coronavirus Public Resources Page — Texasbar.com/COVIDHelp

Texas Lawyers’ Assistance Program Well-being Resources page — Texasbar.com/remote-well-being

Reopening Texas: A Q&A with David Coale — Dallas attorney David Coale recently discussed who has the authority to decide when Texas businesses reopen. (Subscription required) — Texas Lawyer

Texas courts zoom forward with virtual hearings — One month after the rollout of the first virtual courtroom in Texas held via Zoom, more than 8,500 separate proceedings have been held remotely. — Courthouse News Service

Meet next batch of Texas lawyers who will get new kind of swearing-in experience — Because of the COVID-19 pandemic, most individuals who passed the February 2020 Texas Bar Examination and are eligible to be sworn in will do so remotely. (Subscription required) — Texas Lawyer

The coronavirus will change the legal industry’s approach to remote work—but how? — Some hope the strain of juggling bosses, clients, Zoom meetings and family will at least lead to positive changes when the current emergency comes to an end. — Law.com

Best practices for Texas lawyers negotiating over email — Texas lawyers should be acutely aware of legal developments in our state applying the familiar themes of contract law—such as offer and acceptance—to this digital landscape. (Subscription required) — Texas Lawyer

Calls spiked — then dropped. Domestic abuse survivors, at home with abusers during the pandemic, may be unable to get help. — Advocates worry that survivors are struggling to seek help because they’re stuck with their abusers at home due to stay-at-home orders. — The Texas Tribune

SXSW sued over no-refund policy after cancellation — The company that puts on Austin’s internationally acclaimed South by Southwest festival is being sued over its no-refund policy, after the annual event was canceled this year because of the coronavirus pandemic. — Austin American-Statesman

Couple married on Zoom and officiated by district judge — Judge David Stith marries couples online as a result of coronavirus. — Corpus Christi Caller Times

Coronavirus has not stopped many cash-strapped courts from seeking fines and fees — Many courts are continuing to collect fines and fees, even as millions of Americans find themselves out of a job and less able to pay up. — The Marshall Project

Judge tells feds to abide by 20-year deal on release of detained immigrant kids — A federal judge in Los Angeles said Friday the risk of Covid-19 spreading in immigrant detention facilities requires the government to adhere to a longstanding settlement requiring prompt release of immigrant youth from custody. — Courthouse News Service

What the CARES Act means for your student loans (audio) — Part of the CARES Act includes automatic suspension of principal and interest payments on federally held student loans through Sept. 30, 2020. — NPR

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To keep up on the latest legal news from around the state, sign up for the State Bar of Texas’ Daily News Briefing by clicking here.

Curated by Texas Bar Today. Follow us on Twitter @texasbartoday.



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custody during coronavirus: Sad woman doctor leaning against a wall

Mom Loses Custody During Coronavirus Pandemic 

custody during coronavirus: Sad woman doctor leaning against a wall

 

Coronavirus is presenting a new set of challenges to parents who are frontline healthcare workers, and a recent court ruling in Miami has caused one mom in particular to lose custody of her four-year-old daughter due to her job as an emergency room doctor.

Mom Loses Custody During Coronavirus Pandemic

The doctor, Theresa Greene, previously shared custody with her ex husband, Eric Greene, for two years.

“I think it’s not fair, it’s cruel to ask me to choose between my child and the oath I took as a physician,” Greene told CNN. “I won’t abandon my team at work or the patients who will increasingly look to me to save their lives in the coming weeks, but it’s torture.”

The judge responsible for the ruling, Judge Bernard Shapiro of the Eleventh Judicial Circuit of Florida, states that it is in the child’s best interests to stay with the father to reduce the risk of exposure to the virus:

“The Court finds in order to insure and protect the best interests and health of the minor child, this Order must be entered on a temporary basis,” the ruling states.

How Will Custody During Coronavirus Affect Other Workers?

While some frontline healthcare workers like Greene have to face new challenges brought on by child custody issues, she states that employees in other fields aren’t facing the same fate:

“My brother works as an engineer, and he’s building the tent hospitals up in New York. He gets to come home to his two kids. No one is questioning that decision,” Greene told CNN.

Greene says that she has been wearing full PPE (personal protective equipment) while treating her patients, and states that healthcare workers who take the proper precautions are not at risk of spreading the virus.

“If I was married I’d be given the opportunity to go home to my child, no one could tell me I shouldn’t do that,” Greene says.

Custody Issues During COVID-19

COVID-19 has led to increased issues related to child custody, including refusal of visitation orders, changes to custody orders, and temporary rulings. As new stay-at-home orders and lockdown procedures are set in place, many parents fear that their custody agreements may be affected.

Child custody is determined by a number of factors – the child’s best interest being the most paramount. That being said, child custody orders don’t take the events that occur during a global pandemic into account. 

Parents and family law professionals alike are entering uncharted territory when it comes to child custody and visitation agreements.

Greene is appealing the order and will be eligible for future make-up time-sharing as well as video calls every day, but the question remains: when will she be able to see her daughter again? 

As a mom, do you agree with a custody agreement being modified to protect a child from exposure to coronavirus? What would you do if you lost custody of your child because of your job? 

If you’re a mom going through custody issues or trying to co-parent during these difficult times, there are resources you can seek. Although family courts are closed, check your court’s local website or consult with a family lawyer to find out what your options are. For more information on COVID-19 and divorce, click here.

The post Mom Loses Custody During Coronavirus Pandemic  appeared first on Divorced Moms.

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Co-Parenting: Time to Mutually Agree to Save and Protect Your Children During Coronavirus Pandemic

Co-Parenting: Time to Mutually Agree to Save and Protect Your Children During Coronavirus Pandemic

Originally published by Nacol Law Firm.

Dealing with a worldwide medical pandemic and personally trying to stay alive and healthy is mentally changeling, but for parents who are divorced or have separate custody agreements and co- parent, it can be a disaster for the entire family. Hopefully, this Coronavirus Pandemic will be a short-lived life-threatening situation, but how the Co-parents cope with the problem could deeply impact their children’s emotional life.

In Texas, on March 13, 2020, the Texas Supreme Court issued an emergency order that divorced /single parents should go by the originally published school and visitation schedule in their current decree.  Since the last life-threatening pandemic in the United State was the Spanish Flu Pandemic of 1918, most divorce/ single parent agreements do not include a pandemic clause!

Do not be one of those parents who decides that they “are the decision maker” and drives away with the kids for an extended vacation to Grandma’s in Florida without telling the other parent. Or deciding that the family circle of trust does not include their Other Parent and refuses visitation or joint decision making.  These hasty, irrational decisions may seem reasonable in this time of national panic but consider the legal ramifications of violating an order.  Since all courts, in Texas, are now closed except for emergency litigation matters only, when the courts are fully operational again and the medical danger has passed, how will a violation of your current decree look to the Judge?  Judges always look to the needs of the child versus the unreasonable expectations of the parent. There will be serious ramifications against the violating parent.

Let’s look at some ideas on how co-parenting during this pandemic season can work the best for all family members and by joint agreement will save your both money that would normally go to legal fees.

Just remember that as co-parents your children are most important.  Your child has been told that they can’t see their grandparents because of their age and if infected by the coronavirus, may die. No school, no playing of sports, or playing with friends since they may be infected with a deadly virus and become very ill. Decide to cooperate as responsible co-parents to navigate the child to the new changes in their daily routines without a lot of stress and anxiety on the child.  By keeping the child calm and showing “a united family circle” the child will know that Mom and Dad are there for him/her.

Some areas of agreement should be that the child will have regular email, phone calls, FaceTime, Zoom visits, and texting with the other parent. The child needs to know that both parents are safe and interested in their wellbeing. Regular visitations times must be made available for the child to see each parent. Remember the child’s core circle of trust are his/her parents and siblings.

Another very serious matter is the decision of what will happen to the child if one parent becomes ill and cannot care for the child. The joint decision must be made by both parents and must ultimately be in the best interest for the child.

Custody disputes and circumstances that have totally changed in the last month. Just remember, co-parent cooperation is the best choice. There is no doubt that judges will be happy to hear that parents have worked together to meet their child’s best interest, by taking steps to protect the child’s health and safety.

This is a time for mutual give and take from both parents. No one is always right nor always wrong. In this upside crazy pandemic world, jointly trying to navigate your family to a better place will have its own rewards.

If, however, one parent unilaterally refuses to make fair agreements for the children or violates your custody orders, avoid retaliation and follow your decree orders faithfully. This Pandemic will pass, and most Judges will not treat lightly intense misconduct when the courts reopen.

Mark A. Nacol
The Nacol Law Firm P.C.
Dallas, Texas
(972) 690-3333

Click to open Copy of Texas Supreme Court Emergency Order on Child Custody Schedules during Coronavirus Pandemic. (pdf) 

Curated by Texas Bar Today. Follow us on Twitter @texasbartoday.



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Divorce During the Coronavirus Shut Down

Divorce During the Coronavirus Shut Down

You won’t be able to get to the bulk of your divorce issues right now but you can still work on your divorce with video conferencing with your attorney, and other divorce professionals such as a divorce coach, financial analyst, and accountant.

The post Divorce During the Coronavirus Shut Down appeared first on Divorce Magazine.

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