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How Does Shared Custody Work Between Separate States During COVID-19 Quarantine?

How Does Shared Custody Work Between Separate States During COVID-19 Quarantine?

Question:

What is the procedure when traveling across state lines during COVID-19 quarantine, when you share custody?

Answer:

Texas attorney Ashleigh Bearden

As I am barred only in Texas, I cannot provide specific legal tips with regard to your state in particular. However, I can provide some general guidance that may help you navigate your child custody issues during the COVID-19 pandemic.

No nationwide domestic travel prohibitions have been issued, and air and ground travel continues. However, many states have issued orders restricting both interstate and intrastate travel. Some have restricted all non-essential travel and further clarified their orders by defining what travel is considered essential.

Before traveling to exchange your children with your former spouse, consult your state’s executive orders, those in your former spouse’s state, and — if traveling by car — those in the states you will travel through for the exchange. If none of these states restrict travel, you likely are free to proceed with the exchange.

Keep in mind that a state’s stay-at-home order may define travel for these purposes as essential further into the document. Additionally, the order explicitly may not make mention of custody or children, but still may provide that travel for purposes of compliance with a court order is essential.

For example, the order may read similarly to the following: “Individuals may leave their residences for the purposes of traveling required by a court order.” This will apply to any order of the court, including any orders entered pursuant to your divorce or custody matter, so be sure to read the orders carefully and completely.

Additionally, be aware that some states specifically have issued orders regulating travel from certain states or localities. For example, Texas has ordered mandatory 14-day self-quarantines for people traveling by air from certain states, and previously implemented ground checkpoints to identify travelers from Louisiana. Keep in mind that you may be affected by travel restrictions like this.

If you plan to travel by air, be aware that the TSA has implemented social distancing procedures and modified their operations. Recent policies include an allowance for wearing a facemask during screening. However, the agency states that “a TSA officer may ask you to adjust the mask to visually confirm your identity.”

If you find that such travel is not restricted by your state, your ex-spouse’s state, or those states you will travel through by car, and your former spouse refuses to comply with your court-ordered custody or possession agreement, consider consulting a Cordell & Cordell attorney to seek enforcement of your parental rights. Bearing in mind the laws in your state, keep records of your former spouse’s refusal to comply and their stated reasons for doing so.

Regardless of whether you are able to facilitate exchange prior to the end of travel restrictions, these may be helpful to your attorney in the future.

If, however, any of the state orders restrict travel and do not provide clarification on whether travel for the exchange of children under a court order, or for purposes of complying with a court order in general, you should seek legal assistance from an attorney barred in your state.

To arrange an initial consultation to discuss divorce rights for men with a Cordell & Cordell attorney, including Texas divorce lawyer Ashleigh Beardencontact Cordell & Cordell.

The post How Does Shared Custody Work Between Separate States During COVID-19 Quarantine? appeared first on Dads Divorce.

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custody during coronavirus: Sad woman doctor leaning against a wall

Mom Loses Custody During Coronavirus Pandemic 

custody during coronavirus: Sad woman doctor leaning against a wall

 

Coronavirus is presenting a new set of challenges to parents who are frontline healthcare workers, and a recent court ruling in Miami has caused one mom in particular to lose custody of her four-year-old daughter due to her job as an emergency room doctor.

Mom Loses Custody During Coronavirus Pandemic

The doctor, Theresa Greene, previously shared custody with her ex husband, Eric Greene, for two years.

“I think it’s not fair, it’s cruel to ask me to choose between my child and the oath I took as a physician,” Greene told CNN. “I won’t abandon my team at work or the patients who will increasingly look to me to save their lives in the coming weeks, but it’s torture.”

The judge responsible for the ruling, Judge Bernard Shapiro of the Eleventh Judicial Circuit of Florida, states that it is in the child’s best interests to stay with the father to reduce the risk of exposure to the virus:

“The Court finds in order to insure and protect the best interests and health of the minor child, this Order must be entered on a temporary basis,” the ruling states.

How Will Custody During Coronavirus Affect Other Workers?

While some frontline healthcare workers like Greene have to face new challenges brought on by child custody issues, she states that employees in other fields aren’t facing the same fate:

“My brother works as an engineer, and he’s building the tent hospitals up in New York. He gets to come home to his two kids. No one is questioning that decision,” Greene told CNN.

Greene says that she has been wearing full PPE (personal protective equipment) while treating her patients, and states that healthcare workers who take the proper precautions are not at risk of spreading the virus.

“If I was married I’d be given the opportunity to go home to my child, no one could tell me I shouldn’t do that,” Greene says.

Custody Issues During COVID-19

COVID-19 has led to increased issues related to child custody, including refusal of visitation orders, changes to custody orders, and temporary rulings. As new stay-at-home orders and lockdown procedures are set in place, many parents fear that their custody agreements may be affected.

Child custody is determined by a number of factors – the child’s best interest being the most paramount. That being said, child custody orders don’t take the events that occur during a global pandemic into account. 

Parents and family law professionals alike are entering uncharted territory when it comes to child custody and visitation agreements.

Greene is appealing the order and will be eligible for future make-up time-sharing as well as video calls every day, but the question remains: when will she be able to see her daughter again? 

As a mom, do you agree with a custody agreement being modified to protect a child from exposure to coronavirus? What would you do if you lost custody of your child because of your job? 

If you’re a mom going through custody issues or trying to co-parent during these difficult times, there are resources you can seek. Although family courts are closed, check your court’s local website or consult with a family lawyer to find out what your options are. For more information on COVID-19 and divorce, click here.

The post Mom Loses Custody During Coronavirus Pandemic  appeared first on Divorced Moms.

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covid-19 and child custody access: young boy in surgical mask

COVID-19 And Child Custody Access

covid-19 and child custody access: young boy in surgical mask

 

The novel coronavirus, COVID-19, has created fear and uncertainty throughout the United States and the world. This pandemic has affected almost every part of daily life, including co-parenting with ex-spouses.

School closures, social isolation, travel restrictions, and business closures can all affect your ability to co-parent as you would in normal times.

It’s essential for all divorced parents to keep the well-being of the children at the top of mind during this unprecedented time. This means prioritizing the child’s physical and emotional health. Unfortunately, these two things can seem to be at odds during this pandemic when traveling is restricted, but being close to both parents is ideal.

When possible, parents should try to have open and empathetic discussions with their exes in regards to caring for the children during this pandemic. When all parties can agree to help each other as necessary, it can help everyone get through this crisis–especially the children.

However, working through it together is not always possible, especially if your ex-spouse is determined to fight against you. In these cases, it’s important to know the legal standards so that you can avoid any further problems.

COVID-19 And Child Custody Access

Will COVID-19 Affect Custody Access

There is not a single law that covers what all ex-spouses should do regarding custody in emergency situations. Instead, it’s incumbent upon parents to check their divorce decrees and child custody orders to see what these documents say about emergencies. Unfortunately, most agreements do not list anything about what to do during a global pandemic. However, there might be other relevant wording that can help you determine your next steps.

Read through all court orders regarding your case and ask yourself these questions:

  • Who gets the children during school closures?
  • What constitutes an emergency situation according to these documents?
  • What do these orders say I am supposed to do in an emergency?

Once you have considered the legal restrictions within your court orders, you must then consider the changes to your state and local laws. For example, some jurisdictions have ruled that parents should operate as if schools were open. Furthermore, many areas have passed shelter-in-place decrees that restrict the movements of residents.

While many of these decrees allow people to move in order to care for family members, it’s always a good idea to check the text of the bill to be sure.

In general, parents should not expect that COVID-19 and the resulting changes in society will legally stop them from seeing their children. However, some situations may arise in which the health and safety of the child supersede the parent’s rights.

Changing Child Custody Location Temporarily

Some parents may want to travel with their kids during this time, especially with travel so inexpensive. Furthermore, when parents live far away from one another, children may be required to take planes or other public transportation in order to visit their parents. Due to the current and ever-changing situation with the virus, this may be dangerous to the health of the child.

If your child’s other parent wants to travel with your child during this time, you may need judicial intervention in order to stop it. This may be especially important if the child would travel to or through a COVID-19 hotspot. Although many courts have suspended in-person and non-essential hearings, there may be legal actions you can take to stop the travel.

For example, judges may be willing to meet via teleconference. Be sure to contact a family law attorney in your jurisdiction if you find yourself in this situation.

Child Custody Access Modification Due to COVID-19

The COVID-19 pandemic has fundamentally changed many lives. As such, some families may require changes to their child custody agreements. Exes should discuss what they are willing to do in any of the following situations:

  • A child or parent gets the virus
  • Schools close
  • A parent is unable to work

These can be difficult conversations, even if you have a relatively good co-parenting relationship with your ex-spouse. The American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers and the  Association of Family and Conciliation Courts came together to release a set of seven guidelines for co-parents during the COVID-19 crisis. The organizations advise parents to be:

  • Healthy: first and foremost, follow the CDC, state, and local guidelines for health and safety.
  • Mindful: Be aware but calm about the situation, and talk to children about the virus in age-appropriate ways
  • Compliant: follow court orders and custody agreements whenever possible
  • Creative: when parents can’t follow orders precisely, they should work together to find solutions
  • Transparent: be honest with ex-spouses about your situation, particularly when it comes to possible COVID-19 exposure
  • Generous: make reasonable accommodations for the other parent when possible, including allowing makeup time for missed visits
  • Understanding: the pandemic could cause economic hardship for parents paying and receiving child support payments. It’s vital to be understanding of changing circumstances during this time.

Family law can be complicated at the best of times. In times like this, it can leave parents feeling at a loss for what to do. If you have consulted all the legal resources you have and you still have questions, be sure to contact a local family law attorney for help.

The post COVID-19 And Child Custody Access appeared first on Divorced Moms.

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What goes into an award of spousal support here in Texas?

Have you given notice of your summer custody plans?

Originally published by On behalf of Laura Dale.

It’s not too early to be thinking about summer and your plans with the children. You may have a trip in mind, visits to distant relatives or other arrangements to make. Don’t be too quick to make reservations and travel plans if you share custody of the children with their other parent. There are certain steps you must take before changing your possession order.

Creating a workable plan for possession of and access to children is often one of the most difficult parts of a marital breakup. Unfortunately, life is not predictable, and it is sometimes necessary to adjust the schedule. Your summer plans may present unusual circumstances that interfere with your co-parent’s scheduled time with the kids. April is the ideal time to make important decisions about those temporary summer changes in your parenting plan.

What do summer possession plans look like?

You may be among the fortunate parents who worked together to create a unique plan to accommodate the special circumstances in your family. On the other hand, if you and your former partner were unable to reach an agreement, the court probably stepped in an issued a standard possession order. Typically, this alternates special holidays on even and odd years and allows the non-custodial parent to have possession of the children during the month of July.

However, what if your plans for summer fall outside of the weeks between July 1 and July 31? If you want the children at some other time over the summer, you must notify your parenting partner as early as possible in April. The other parent also has the right to be with the children for one weekend during your extended possession. Scheduling your summer plans right now makes it easier for both you and the other parent to arrange dates that will suit everyone.

Fighting for your rights this summer

Departing from your possession order is not always easy, especially if your parenting partner is not willing to cooperate. However, you have rights as a parent, and in most cases, Texas family courts support your right to access to your child.

If you are fighting to extend your standard possession of the children over the summer, you may find the effort frustrating. You may benefit from learning more about your rights and obtaining the strong and compassionate advocacy of a Texas attorney who will assist you in reaching your goals.

Curated by Texas Bar Today. Follow us on Twitter @texasbartoday.



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Men’s Divorce Podcast: How COVID-19 Impacts Child Custody

Men’s Divorce Podcast: How COVID-19 Impacts Child Custody

In the latest episode of the Men’s Divorce Podcast, Cordell & Cordell CEO Scott Trout and divorce attorney Charles Hatley discuss how the COVID-19 pandemic is impacting child custody issues.

Cordell & Cordell is currently hosting a series of free weekly webinars covering how the Coronavirus is affecting divorce cases. Men and fathers across the country are facing uncertainties like never before. To help answer some of the most frequently asked questions, Cordell & Cordell is producing a series of podcasts that take a deeper dive into some of the issues covered in the weekly webinars.

In this episode, Mr. Trout and Mr. Hatley look at how the pandemic is affecting a number of issues related to child custody such as how to arrange custody drop-offs when a shelter-in-place order is in effect.

Click the link below to listen to the full episode. Also make sure to subscribe to the podcast on iTunes or whichever podcast app you prefer.

The post Men’s Divorce Podcast: How COVID-19 Impacts Child Custody appeared first on Dads Divorce.

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Custody in a Time of Crisis: Custody and COVID-19

Custody in a Time of Crisis: Custody and COVID-19

When you’re a divorced parent, being separated from your child when your former spouse takes custody is difficult enough. But doing it during a pandemic can be downright unbearable.

The post Custody in a Time of Crisis: Custody and COVID-19 appeared first on Divorce Magazine.

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co-parenting during COVID-19

Coronavirus and child custody: Co-parenting during the pandemic

co-parenting during COVID-19

As a parent, you want to spend as much time with your children as humanly possible. You want to watch them learn and grow, as the years pass. Even after a divorce, you still are able to enjoy precious moments with them during your parenting time.

However, with the Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19) pandemic that has swept the country, your parenting time may become part of the uncertainty.

While you want to maintain the World Health Organization recommendations regarding social distancing, hygiene, and sanitation, you still should be able to observe regular parenting time during this difficult time. However, your co-parent may be making that more difficult.

From a safety standpoint, it is understandable that your
co-parent is concerned over the prospect that your shared children may catch
the virus, or that you may while they are in your care. Additionally, many
areas of the country have shelter-in-place orders that prevent unnecessary
travel.

However, that does not extend to child custody drop-offs or
pick-ups.

Issues with shelter-in-place
and custody travel

According to Cordell & Cordell family law attorney Charles Hatley, residents are required to stay indoors except to perform certain necessary activities. These activities include buying food, seeking medical treatment, banking, and laundromat services. This also includes any travel necessary to enforce a court order and for purposes of caring for a child or family member.

Therefore, the shelter-in-place orders, or stay-at-home
orders, do not impact your right to parenting time, whether there is actually a
custody and parenting time order. However, that does not mean the other parent
will not misconstrue or try to abuse these orders in an attempt to block your
access to your child.

You may be like many parents during this coronavirus crisis who
are being forced to miss scheduled parenting time because of a co-parent who
feels honoring the court order is unsafe.

Facing parenting
time denial

During a recent webinar, Cordell & Cordell CEO, Executive/Managing Partner Scott Trout and Partner Dan Cuneo discussed how the coronavirus has been impacting regularly scheduled parenting time, and they spoke about the challenges that fathers have been facing as they deal with the ramifications of existing and legally-binding custody schedules no longer being upheld.

“If you are being denied time, there still may be remedies
available to you,” Mr. Cuneo said. “We want you to reach out and contact an
attorney and discuss what are your options, what do we need to do. It could
depend upon the jurisdiction that you’re in. There are essential remedies
available to you, and we want to make sure that you’re not being taken
advantage of and that you’re not sitting back and missing out on time.”

Additionally, this webinar detailed how this type of situation is being handled in several areas of the country. For example, in California, where the shelter-in-place order has been in effect since March 19, family courts are emphasizing the use of common sense, according to Cordell & Cordell Lead Litigator Jason Hopper.

“The standing order from almost all of our courts are that
the existing orders are to be followed,” Mr. Hopper said. “Parenting time and
is deemed essential travel. It’s not within the confines of the shelter in
place rules.”

Filing with family
court still possible

While there may be logistical issues involved in the family
court process during this shutdown associated with the coronavirus pandemic, you
and your family law attorney still are able to file in your state.

“In-person court is banned, so if you have a case, where you are supposed to be seeing your children and your ex-wife has cut you off, we can’t run full throttle into court to file anything and get in front of a judge immediately,” said Cordell & Cordell Litigation Partner Kristin Zurek. “But our courts are still open for filings, so it’s important to know that if something is going on and you want to bring it to the judge’s attention, go talk to your lawyer. You have the ability to upload pleadings to the court.”

While the court may be receiving filings, you may need more,
in order to incite action from the family courts under these circumstances. You
may need to illustrate that this is an emergency situation.

“The judge’s determination needs to be whether or not this
is an emergency that requires a phone conference or a video conference to deal
with it or if it’s something that’s going to have to wait until court reopens,”
Ms. Zurek said.

While the courts may find that the situation is not deemed
to be an emergency, it still is worthwhile to file, offering the court
documented evidence of how much you care about your children.

“It’s still important to get that on file as soon as possible, because you don’t want strategically, the court saying when court is back in session ‘Well, you must have not thought it was that important, because you didn’t file anything,’” said Cordell & Cordell Litigation Partner Kelly Burris. “It’s important to get things on file and see what options you have.”

Child support
challenges

Additionally, issues surrounding child support may arise
during the coronavirus pandemic that may require legal attention. Much of the
population is experiencing financial hardship, and many are expected to lose
their employment. If you do lose your job or find yourself with some sort of
wage reduction, how will you support your children and pay the court-ordered
child support during this challenging time?

“If you are facing a job loss or a wage reduction, one of
the first, most practical things you can do without involving an attorney is to
approach your employer and ask if they will be providing any qualified disaster
relief payments,” Mr. Hopper said. “Typically, when an employer provides any
type of compensation or benefit to an employee, that’s going to be a taxable
event. However, there are provisions within federal code and Internal Revenue
code, as well as in many states’ revenue codes that allow for employers to
provide to employees when there is a disaster declaration, like there is
currently nationwide, qualified disaster relief payments.”

While this may partially assist your financial situation,
you still must deal with the child support order itself. Given the
circumstance, seeking legal assistance may be the only way of navigating these
complex waters and avoiding the piling up of payments that you can no longer
afford.

“Consult with an attorney,” Mr. Hopper said. “You likely
have modification rights available to you.”

If you do not pursue modification, the child support
payments do not go away, just because you no longer have a job or because of
the coronavirus pandemic. You still can find yourself facing hefty child
support payments that if ignored, can become overwhelming, especially with your
children caught in the crossfires.

“You have to file your modification immediately,” said Cordell & Cordell Litigation Partner Rick Julius. “If things change and you don’t find it to be financially beneficial to you once the courts get open, you at least, have that decision down the road. Pennsylvania courts [Mr. Julius’ licensed state] are only going to go back as that modification filing date, in order to do that. It may end up that when it gets heard, that the financial situation has corrected itself and you may be entitled to retroactive modification of that time period.”

Parent, co-parent,
and monitor the situation

With all of the health and economic uncertainty caused by
the coronavirus pandemic, it is necessary for you to learn as much as possible
regarding your state’s family court system and how they handle emergency
situations. That way, if you find yourself facing unemployment with a large
monthly child support payment, or a co-parent who refuses to adhere to the
parenting time issued by the court, you know how to react.

It also is important to understand the perspective of your
children during this pandemic. They may be confused or scared, and as a parent,
it is necessary for you to take time for them, explaining to them the situation
in terms that they understand and monitor their wellness as much as possible.

If it is possible to remain amicable with your co-parent
during this time, do so. Communication and cooperation are necessary components
to co-parenting during normal situations, but with the coronavirus pandemic, it
becomes even more crucial that you put the needs of your children first, before
any animosity.

While this may be an instance of uncertainty, it is necessary for you to monitor the situation from a legal perspective and contact your family law attorney if you feel that changes need to be made.

Related coronavirus coverage:

Free Webinar: Can the Coronavirus Affect Custodial Rights? How Divorces and Parenting Time May Be Impacted

Can I make up lost parenting time due to the COVID-19 pandemic?

Does a Shelter-in-Place Order Limit my Right to Parenting Time?

The post Coronavirus and child custody: Co-parenting during the pandemic appeared first on Dads Divorce.

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The Effects of COVID-19 on Child Custody Matters

The Effects of COVID-19 on Child Custody Matters

Originally published by Francesca Blackard.

By

As cases of COVID-19 are continually popping up in the North Texas region (currently 155 confirmed cases in Dallas County and growing) and with the recent “Stay Home Stay Safe” Order that went into effect at 11:59 PM on March 23, 2020, parents are scrambling to find reliable answers to their questions regarding possession schedules and quarantine, as well as concerns about child support. These are questions that are relatively unprecedented in today’s world, and with the courts recently ruling on several of these topics, this blog seeks to provide helpful updates during this difficult time.

In its March 17, 2020 emergency order, the Supreme Court of Texas, ordered that court-ordered possession schedules remain in accordance with any original published school calendar regardless of the newly extended Spring Breaks or school closures. This order is effective until May 8, 2020 or until further notice. However, as the situation continues to ramp up, and fears about this pandemic are at an all-time high, many parents want to take precautionary measures to keep their family safe.

Various concerns have arisen regarding possession schedules when one parent is quarantined for possible contraction of COVID-19. The Dallas County family courts have recently released a statement encouraging parents to keep open lines of communication with and one another and to make all decisions with the well-being and health of the child as the primary concern. This communication should include notifying the other parent of any exposure to or a positive diagnosis of COVID-19, as well as discussing any actions necessary to ensure the child’s safety. Unfortunately, disagreements regarding the custody or possession of a child may arise, and it is imperative that you consult with your attorney to discuss questions about establishing alternative schedules before making any decisions with your co-parent or ex-spouse
Continue reading →

Curated by Texas Bar Today. Follow us on Twitter @texasbartoday.



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Shared Custody In The Midst Of Coronavirus

When It Comes To Joint Custody In The Midst Of Coronavirus Be ‘Flexible’

Shared Custody In The Midst Of Coronavirus

 

Tensions have never run higher when it comes to contentious relations between divorced parents with joint custody because many are now arguing about where the children would be most safe in order to ensure their safety.

While the “physical custody” parent may insist the child(ren) should remain with him/her while the country waits out the dangers of Covid-19, that may prove to be narrow thinking because it is possible that the residence where the child(ren) lives most often could be the home that leaves the child(ren) most susceptible to contracting or transmitting the disease.

Couple that with the reality that most courts are temporarily shutting down, squabbles and all-out divorce wars, are escalating with little or no intervention from the court system, unless the argument rises to the level of domestic violence.

With that in mind, my plea (and others in my field of family law) is to be flexible with your ex.

Shared Custody In The Midst Of Coronavirus

The following are some tips to help divorced parents weather this uncertain crisis:

  1. If you and your ex can’t agree on a new temporary arrangement, ask for intervention from your attorney, therapist, clergy or trusted advisor. The courts may not be available for seeking a remedy for a significant amount of time. Only in highly critical situations will the courts get involved.
  2. As you formulate your side of the argument with your ex, take a pause and remember that what is best for your child(ren) at this time must be your number one priority.
  3. Start any conversations with a new mindset: the intention of being flexible about changing the routine from that which you have been used to.
  4. Be practical in your decision making. For instance, if you have physical custody, and your ex lives alone where he/she can easily isolate your child(ren) from exposure to others, might it be prudent to agree to leave the (child)ren in the care of that parent for this period of time?
  5. When creating any new schedule, make certain the kid(s) aren’t subject to “subtle parental alienation.” Make sure you facilitate both verbal and visual communication. Fortunately, today, we have social media platforms; we have Facebook, Zoom, Join.me, Skype, group texts, and smartphone communication like Facetime. Instagram provides near real-time sharing of photos. This is yet another way for the “self-distancing” parent to keep in touch with their child(ren) throughout the day and evening. There are apps for many face-to-face communication opportunities. Download them now. That way you can connect your child(ren) 24/7, being careful not to disturb the other parent at inappropriate times.
  6. Address the trauma your child(ren) are experiencing. Does he/she/they need immediate therapy as they try to face their fear and uncertainty? If so, reach out. Get help.
  7. Both parents need to work together to keep the child(ren’s) schedule(s) as regular as possible based on what they have been used to.
  8. Lastly, engender a peaceful vibe in front of your child(ren), especially in the presence of your ex. The current situation is stressful enough without adding more tension to the situation. Circling back to my core message in this article: Be flexible!

The post When It Comes To Joint Custody In The Midst Of Coronavirus Be ‘Flexible’ appeared first on Divorced Moms.

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common mistakes in child custody cases

5 Common Mistakes Made In Child Custody Cases

common mistakes in child custody cases

 

Getting a divorce can be a taxing and tenuous task for all parties involved but can be even more so when your child is involved. When the couple split up in a divorce with a child, the issue of child custody comes up.

Child custody cases resolve who will take care, custody, and control of the child. This can be assigned to one or both parents. A parent with custody of a child takes care of their upbringing, education, place of living, and even scheduling time with the other parent if necessary.

However, no matter how your divorce case plays out, there are many mistakes you can make that can affect your custody case over your child. If you are dealing with a divorce or custody case and need a divorce lawyer, contact us at Simonetti & Associates to help represent you.

Common Mistakes in Custody Cases:

When in a custody case, you would want to do everything you can to achieve a favorable outcome. However, there are some mistakes that you can make that will sabotage your chances of a good outcome from your child custody case.

If you are looking for quality representation to help you in your custody case, finding the right divorce lawyer can make or break your case. Some critical mistakes made in custody cases include:

  • Getting too emotional– Losing your cool, yelling, threatening, or any other signs of violence can be used in the case against you and ruin custody rights you may have been able to get otherwise.
  • Abusing Social Media– Openly criticizing your spouse or bad-mouthing them on social media platforms will reflect poorly on yourself, and can be used against your case in court.
  • Forgetting to put your child first– The court will always prioritize what is best for the child over everything else, and you should do the same. Even if you do not like the other parent, if it would be best for your child to get some time with them then you should consider the options. Or if you want to move to another area, but doing so would harm the child’s life in some way, you may want to reconsider.
  • Manipulating the child– manipulating your children against the other parent will only make it more difficult for them to cope with the situation, which will impact your chances of a beneficial custody case.
  • Not working with a former spouse where you can– Divorces aren’t always easy or pleasant, but outright refusing to work with a spouse can reflect negatively on your abilities as a parent. No matter how you feel about your former spouse, you should try to be open about working with them to create the best possible solution for your child.

Why a Divorce Lawyer Can Help

Divorce cases can become complicated and emotional and can be very taxing on your day to day life while in one. But to get favorable custody, you should try to be calm, reasonable, and responsible. Working to assure the best possible future for your child is the goal of custody court, and should be yours as well.

A divorce is never an easy circumstance to face in life. Not only are you parting ways with someone who you once loved deeply, but you must face an assortment of issues that go along with divorce, such as custody battles.

During this deeply stressful time, it can be difficult to make important decisions with a clear head. That is why the help of a divorce lawyer is critical in helping you win your case and facilitate all important matters regarding your divorce. Take the time to find the best representation for your case so that you can walk away knowing that you did everything you could to reach a proper settlement.

The post 5 Common Mistakes Made In Child Custody Cases appeared first on Divorced Moms.

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